local feature

Education
8:56 am
Mon November 11, 2013

RI Veteran Transitions From Military To Student Life At URI

Credit RIPR FILE

On this Veterans Day we meet Donald Ruggieri.  He served five years in the Marine Corps, and was deployed to Iraq as an explosives dog handler.

He continued that work state-side, working with the secret service on missions for both President Bush and President Obama.

Ruggieri is not only a veteran, but also a student at URI where he is studying to become a veterinarian. 

Ruggieri spoke with Rhode Island Public Radio’s education reporter Elisabeth Harrison.

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The Bottom Line
3:55 pm
Fri November 8, 2013

The Bottom Line: RI Transportation Funding Faces An Uncertain Future

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for a weekly business segment we're calling "The Bottom Line." Each Friday they look at business news and themes that affect local business and the public.

This week Dave and Mark talk with Department of Transportation Director Michael Lewis. They not only discuss why ridership is light on the commuter rail line south of Providence. Director Lewis also talks about the federal highway trust that’s expected to run dry by next year. It’s the state’s only source of transportation funding.

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Political Roundtable
4:00 am
Fri November 8, 2013

Political Roundtable: Ken Block on Going Republican; His Plan to Save $1B + His Primary With Fung

Credit Ian Donnis / RIPR

Republican candidate for governor Ken Block joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss his campaign; why he became a Republican; the fate of the Moderate Party; his plan to save $1 billion over four years; and more.

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Theater Reviews
4:10 am
Wed November 6, 2013

2nd Story’s “Sons of the Prophet” Doesn’t Shy Away From Anything

Vince Petronio, Nathan Goncalves, Andrew Iacovelli, Jed Hancock-Brainerd, Paula Faber star in 2nd Story Theatre's "Sons of the Prophet."
Credit Richard W. Dionne, Jr. / 2nd Story Theatre

“Sons of the Prophet” comes to Rhode Island with a pretty darn good reputation. Brown University graduate Stephan Karam’s play was a finalist for a Pulitzer Prize in 2012 and did win several awards that year. It was a favorite of Manhattan’s downtown theater crowd, too.

So, what happened?

At 2nd Story this work, which the author calls “a comedy about a guy coping with chronic pain” seems pretty much weak-kneed. Its “comedy” never really clicks; its philosophy, which seems to be that coping with the unspeakable can be nourishing, doesn’t seem real, or true.

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Education
8:41 am
Tue November 5, 2013

Despite Critics, Achievement First Charter School Up And Running

Emily James teaches a first grade class at Providence's first Achievement First charter elementary school.
Credit Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Achievement First is a brand new charter school in Providence that also operates schools in Connecticut and New York.  Critics fought hard to keep it from opening in Rhode Island, arguing that among other problems, it would take money away from other public schools. But supporters and organizers from Achievement First say they are offering an alternative to public schools that are struggling. Rhode Island Public Radio's Education Reporter Elisabeth Harrison took a tour of the Providence school.

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Scott MacKay Commentary
8:24 am
Mon November 4, 2013

Scott MacKay Commentary: What We Can Learn As Part Of Red Sox Nation

Fenway Park in Boston, the capital of Red Sox Nation.
Credit ESPN

The Boston Red Sox, New England’s most beloved sports team, are the world champions of baseball. Rhode Island Public Radio's political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what we can learn from these men who played a boys game with joy.

Fifty years ago, the French-born cultural historian Jacques Barzun wrote a lyrical paean to baseball. His most noted passage was that ``whoever wants to know the heart and mind of America had better learn baseball, the rules, and reality of the game.’’

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The Bottom Line
2:31 pm
Fri November 1, 2013

The Bottom Line: I-195 Redevelopment Involves Going Down Before Going Up

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for a weekly business segment we're calling "The Bottom Line." Each Friday they look at business news and themes that affect local business and the public.

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Artscape
9:05 am
Thu October 31, 2013

Artscape: At Brown, Annual Organ Concert Keeps Things Creepy Each Halloween

The massive 1903 organ in Sayles Hall at Brown University.
Credit John Bender / RIPR

For the last twenty years Brown University’s organist Mark Steinbach has been playing a concert on Halloween at midnight.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender, went out to the University to learn more about the spooky tradition, and what makes a piece of music scary.

That’s Mark Steinbach, the University Organist at Brown.  He’s practicing for his annual organ recital which happens at midnight on Halloween.

“Technically it starts at 11:59 pm, so that people know which day to come,” said Steinbach.

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Artscape
4:08 am
Thu October 31, 2013

Artscape: Providence Loves HP Lovecraft

Brown librarian Holly Snyder holds one of HP Lovecraft's hand-drawn pamphlets.
Credit Catherine Welch / RIPR

As a 10-year-old child, Howard Phillips Lovecraft would tuck himself into his grandfather’s library and read. Lovecraft’s father had gone mad and his mother eventually would too, making his wealthy grandfather – and all of those books –the center of Lovecraft’s world. Then his world fell apart. Lovecraft’s grandfather died and the estate was badly managed, wiping away his comfortable life in Providence. To earn much needed income Lovecraft, at 13-years-old, carefully crafted astronomy pamphlets and sold them, essentially starting his career as a published writer.

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Theater Reviews
4:20 am
Wed October 30, 2013

Festival Ballet's Up Close Is One Of Its Best

Ruth Whitney and Alan Alberto in Boyko Dossev's "Lovers' Song" at Festival Ballet's "Up Close."
Credit A. Cemal Ekin

Widely varied, indeed.

This latest “Up Close” offers dances from the 19th century to world premieres. Topics range from a smartly funny, and goofy, piece called “Tea Time” to a heart-rending vision of the end of life. The music? Well, that goes from Igor Stravinsky and Gustav Mahler to Ray Charles and Jacques Brel.

The dancing by Festival’s best is, generally, at a high level. And, of course, in that rehearsal room the dancers are right there in front of you.

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