local feature

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Right across from the Johnston Town Hall is the home of the Autism Project, a nonprofit that helps kids with autism spectrum disorder learn to cope with their condition. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Democrat Hillary Clinton won the state of Rhode Island in November, but then-candidate Donald Trump beat her by 14 points in Johnston.

One Square Mile Johnston: 100,000 Meatballs

Jan 31, 2017
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

This week our series "One Square Mile" is shining a light on the town of Johnston. You can’t talk about Johnston without talking about Italians, and some would say you can’t talk about Italians without talking about Italian food. We talk to one expert: a 92-year-old woman who, by her granddaughter's estimate, has made 100,000 meatballs in her lifetime.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Virtually all Rhode Islanders have at least a loose connection to the town of Johnston. Almost all of your junk -- trash, dried out Christmas trees, even used paint -- winds up at the Johnston Landfill.  Those items are all sorted and processed in different parts of the sprawling complex.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark discuss cybersecurity at work and at home. They speak with Francesca Spidalieri, a Senior Fellow for Cyber Leadership at the Pell Center at Salve Regina University in Newport. She’s also a member of the Governor’s Cyber Security Commission.

The three talk about likely cyber-threats, how cyber-phishing gets into work and home computers, as well as wired appliances and the so-called “internet of things.”

For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio's Chuck Hinman speaks to author Dawn Tripp of Westport, MA. In Tripp’s latest novel, Georgia, she imagines the inner life of Georgia O’Keefe, an American painter known for still lives and landscapes that evoke sensual femininity. Tripp’s book is out in paperback this month. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

People with Down Syndrome are living longer than they ever have before. But with that good news comes a troubling statistic. 

Peter Goldberg / Gamm Theatre

Way back in 1934, Lillian Hellman's “The Children's Hour” was a shocker. Produced in New York,  it was banned in Boston, Chicago and London. Now the Gamm Theatre has revived the drama, and Rhode Island Public Radio's Bill Gale says it's worth it. 

Lisa Quinones for NENC


Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

On Martin Luther King Day Trinity Rep opened “The Mountaintop,”  a play that salutes Dr. King. Rhode Island Public Radio's Bill Gale says the show works, to an extent, at least.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark discuss Rhode Island’s current business climate, which seems to be slowly improving, but not yet recovering from the Great Depression. They jump off with the monthly economic report from University of Rhode Island professor Len Lardaro.

They also talk about new companies coming to Rhode Island, as well as the struggles to start as small business in the smallest state.

When to listen:

Gulf of Maine Research Institute

Some fishermen are pinning their hopes on a new kind of trawl net at use in the Gulf of Maine, designed to scoop up abundant flatfish such as flounder and sole while avoiding species such as cod, which regulators say are in severe decline.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Rhode Island House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello wants to get rid of the car tax. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says this is a good idea, if lawmakers can find the money to pay for it.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week's guest is Danny Warshay, executive director of the Jonathan M. Nelson Center for Entrepreneurship at Brown University.

Warshay, who helped to start a manufacturing business in Rhode Island, discusses why Brown is fertile ground for entrepreneurs, and how the university is working to make entrepreneurship a cornerstone for students and faculty of all disciplines.

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