local feature

Elisabeth Harrison

Al’s Place in Woonsocket serves up Tourtière, a French-Canadian style of meat pie, in a tiny one-room diner, with a few red stools lining the counter. Roland Gagne sits at one of those stools, remembering Christmas dinners from his childhood.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week, Rhode Island Public Radio’s political commentator Scott MacKay joins Dave and Mark to look at the future of the Ocean State’s economy in the New Year.

Ryan Caron King / VPR/NENC

New England has roughly 400,000 immigrants without legal status living and working from Connecticut and Rhode Island to Maine.

SHERYL RICH-KERN

For college students, the academic year is well underway. Students have spent the first semester making new friends and adjusting to classes and dorm life.

But unlike previous generations, these young adults are more likely to report anxiety and depression.

And that has campus mental health centers struggling to keep up with demand.

At Keene State College in New Hampshire, English major Aidan Bolduc sits near a window in the atrium, as other students banter over summer escapades and coursework.

Virginia Institute of Marine Science / Creative Commons License via Flickr

 

There’s some good news for sushi lovers. A new report finds that over an 8-year period, mercury levels in Gulf of Maine tuna declined 2 percent a year — a decline that parallels reductions in mercury pollution from Midwest coal-fired power plants.

Two years ago, Dr. Nicholas Fisher, a professor of marine sciences at Stony Brook University in New York, had a bit of luck — he found out that a colleague had established a collection of 1,300 western Atlantic bluefin taken from the Gulf of Maine between 2004 and 2012.

Ryan Caron King / VPR/NENC

Part 3 of a four-part New England News Collaborative series called "Facing Change"

Next month, a mix of Syrian and Iraqi refugees will begin arriving in Rutland, Vermont. They’ll be the first of 100 that will be resettled there over the next year. 

Chuck Hinman

Earlier this month, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature to Bob Dylan. While not quite as shocking as when Dylan went electric at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965, the award still caused some controversy among those critics who felt it was artistically unjustified. They said the singer-songwriter known for such influential songs as “Blowing in the Wind” and “Like a Rolling Stone” was not creating literature.

For this month’s Artscape, RIPR’s Chuck Hinman gets some perspective on the award from Harvard classics professor Richard Thomas, who also teaches a seminar on Dylan.


Robin Lubbock / WBUR/NENC

Part 2 of a four-part New England News Collaborative series called "Facing Change"

New England is an old region, and not just by historical standards.

The population here is aging faster than almost any other place in the country. Fewer people are having children, and many of the states struggle to keep younger generations living and working here.

Ryan Caron King / NENC

Part 1 of a four-part New England News Collaborative series called "Facing Change"

New England is facing a demographic crisis: its people are getting too old to work. States are desperate for young workers who can fill jobs, attract businesses and pay taxes. 

Jack Rodolico / VPR/NENC

For one of New England's biggest developers, Brady Sullivan Properties, there’s been a lot of bad news over the past year. State and federal investigators have found lead contamination and illegal toxic dumping. And those are just the cases that made headlines – in recent years there have been other complaints involving Brady Sullivan projects from homeowners and others. Regulators haven’t taken a comprehensive look at all these incidents to see if there’s a pattern at play. For the New England News Collaborative, NHPR’s Jack Rodolico reports,

RIPR FILE

The holidays are a time for family, faith, food and lights. At least, that’s what you told us when we asked for your holiday traditions, and what gets you in the holiday spirit. Today we’ll hear about holiday rituals from five different Rhode Islanders. We start with part-time Providence resident Michelle Madsen-Bibeau, the interim pastor at Beneficent Congregational Church. For her, Christmas is a not a vacation.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Beginning in February, low-income seniors and disabled Rhode Islanders will pay 50 cents to ride Rhode Island Public Transit buses.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo has had an eventful 2016 -- from a string of recent job announcements to the troubled rollouts of the state's new tourism campaign and the new IT system for administering human service benefits. 

RIPR FILE

The holiday concert: it’s a rite of passage for the thousands kids in bands, chorus, and orchestras across the country. By Christmas Eve, more than 3,000 students will have performed under the marble rotunda at the Rhode Island Statehouse.

Rhode Island Public Radio's Ximena Conde caught up with North Providence’s Middle School Select Band, as they gave their performance. The students learned that a lot can happen before the show goes on.

Greg Berger directs the band. You also hear the voices of drummer Cameron Geruso and clarinetist Trevor Gaouette. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

It’s been nearly two years since the Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management and the Attorney General filed a lawsuit against a metal recycling company on the Providence waterfront for allegedly failing to comply with environmental protection laws.

Pages