local feature

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Police departments in our region and around the country are scrambling to respond to the opioid addiction crisis. 

A spate of high profile police shootings have drawn attention to the way police respond to people dealing with mental illness. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

All you needed to know about yesterday’s  election in Rhode Island  was on display last night at the Garden Room at Biltmore Hotel in downtown Providence, the ancestral home of Democratic Party election  bashes for generations.

Elisabeth Harrison

This week, in our RhodyVotes ’16 election coverage, we aired a conversation with Republicans about why they do, or do not, support Donald Trump. One piece of the conversation ended up on the cutting room floor, but it raised interesting questions about immigration. We’re going to spend a few minutes discussing those comments now.

John Bender / RIPR

Preliminary results for Rhode Island's General Election show Democrat Hillary Clinton leading Republican Donald Trump. A ballot measure for a casino in Tiverton appears headed for passage. And voters have approved bond issues for port upgrades, green space, the state Veteran's home and construction at the University of Rhode Island. 

John Bender / RIPR

Over the last few months we’ve brought you our series “Speaking Across Difference,” the stories of Rhode Islanders bridging divides of religion, socio-economic status and more.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

On Tuesday, voters will decide whether to fund improvements at two of Rhode Island’s ports. It’s Question 5 on the ballot for a bond that would modernize Pier 2 at the Port of Davisville in Quonset, and expand the Port of Providence. Rhode Island Public Radio Environmental Reporter Ambar Espinoza met with port officials and environmentalists to learn what’s at stake. 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line. 

This week, Dave speaks with Dr. Patrick T. Kelly, Associate Professor of Accountancy at Providence College School of Business.

Marc Nozell / Flickr

National polling shows a tightening race for presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. In Rhode Island, Clinton is expected to win, but Republicans say don’t count Trump out just yet.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR


Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in North Dakota has asked for support from across the country in its fight against construction of a crude oil pipeline across tribal land. They’ve encouraged peaceful demonstrations and acts of civil disobedience against investors and other backers of the project. Rhode Island environmental activists and concerned residents have responded to their call, holding a third rally yesterday in Providence.

Karen Brown / NEPR/NENC

Massachusetts is one of about 40 states where someone who abuses drugs or alcohol to an extreme can be legally committed to a locked treatment facility -- along with Maine, Vermont and New Hampshire. Rhode Island allows legal commitment only for alcohol addiction. In most cases, a worried family member has to go to court to make that happen.

But one recent trend that has surprised even court officials is how many addicts are appealing directly to a judge — willing to give up their civil rights in exchange for some help.

Samuel F. Babbitt / Courtesy MacMillan Children's Publishing Group/NPR

Natalie Babbitt, the 84-year-old author of the popular children's novel "Tuck Everlasting," died Monday at her home in Hamden, Connecticut.

The novel left a big mark on young readers. It tells the story of a magical spring that grants eternal life to anyone who drinks from it – and a girl who has to decide whether to live forever or accept her eventual death. Babbitt told NPR’s Melissa Block last year that she decided to write "Tuck Everlasting" in 1975 after she realized her 4-year-old daughter was terrified of death.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Next week voters go to the polls to pick the next president of the United States. Rhode Island voters also vote on several statewide issues, including the proposal to build a casino in Tiverton.

As part of our Rhody Votes ’16 coverage Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender headed to Tiverton, where residents are seemed lukewarm about the casino.

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