local seafood

Virginia Institute of Marine Science / Creative Commons License via Flickr

 

There’s some good news for sushi lovers. A new report finds that over an 8-year period, mercury levels in Gulf of Maine tuna declined 2 percent a year — a decline that parallels reductions in mercury pollution from Midwest coal-fired power plants.

Two years ago, Dr. Nicholas Fisher, a professor of marine sciences at Stony Brook University in New York, had a bit of luck — he found out that a colleague had established a collection of 1,300 western Atlantic bluefin taken from the Gulf of Maine between 2004 and 2012.

Sea Robin Anyone? Chefs Get Acquainted With Local Seafood

Jul 22, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island’s waters teem with tasty fish. But we’re not eating most of them. That’s partly because much of it gets shipped overseas, and partly because Rhode Islanders just haven’t developed a taste for fish many consider trash – or “bycatch.” A group of chefs, scientists, and fishermen want to change that. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Fishermen are facing tougher quotas and declining populations for some of the most popular fish species, most notably Cod, a New England favorite. That’s one reason why environmentalists and fishermen have been working to promote more locally-caught seafood. Some, like lobster, quahogs, and other shellfish are catching on. But there are other fish that teem the waters of Narragansett Bay. There's one effort underway to raise awareness about scup, an abundant local catch. 

The Department of Environmental Management will host Rhode Island Agriculture Day at the State House today with a number of activities, including the announcement of the 17 grant recipients of the Local Agriculture and Seafood Act.