Luis Aponte

RIPR FILE PHOTO

The Providence City Council withdrew a proposed rule change Monday that would have allowed councilors to remove a sitting president. The decision followed former President Luis Aponte’s recent resignation.

John Bender / RIPR

Providence City Councilors will consider changing their governing rules, during a special council meeting Monday night. It would allow for the removal of the council president any time during his or her term with a two-thirds majority vote.

John Bender / RIPR

A majority of Providence city councilors have scheduled a special meeting to remove their President Luis Aponte from his post. In order to do so, the council must formally change their rules.

Currently, there appears to be no procedure to remove Aponte from his post. If the measure is adopted, this language would be added to the city council rules:

Stormy times in DC, and no shortage of news at home, a.k.a. Crimetown. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

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Once again, corruption overshadows the financial and social struggles of Providence city government. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay parses the indictment of Council President Luis Aponte.  

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

U.S. Rep. Jim Langevin joins Political Roundtable to discuss the firing of FBI director James Comey; the controversy involving former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn; and the charges against City Council President Luis Aponte.

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza has called for indicted city council president Luis Aponte to step down as the council’s leader, but two council leaders, President  Pro Tempore Sabina Matos and Majority Leader Bryan Principe, ducked the issue in statements today.

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Providence City Council President Luis Aponte pleaded not guilty after being arraigned Wednesday on four charges related to his campaign finances.

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The Providence City Council has been ensnared in controversy of late. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders why the council is so ineffective.

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Serious financial challenges continue to dog Rhode Island’s capital city. And now, there’s a cloud hanging over the Providence City Council, with two councilors  facing close public scrutiny.

Ian Donnis / RIPR File Photo

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza unveils the city’s latest budget proposal Wednesday, and it comes as the city continues to face deep financial challenges.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

In response to news that Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island plans to move its customer operations from downtown Providence to East Providence, Providence City Council President Luis Aponte says the move merits attention from councilors.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A spokeswoman for the State Police confirmed the investigation Thursday. In March, a grand jury subpoenaed the city of Providence for Aponte’s payroll information. The city complied with the request, according to a spokeswoman for the city.

The move comes after the state Board of Elections referred to the attorney general’s office last September a lengthy report about Aponte’s finances.

Investigators have not specified the nature of the probe. State Police confirmed the investigation, but declined to comment further.

A new baseball season dawns, and the General Assembly gets ready to get down to the nitty gritty. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

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Some Providence youths accused of non-violent infractions will soon have an option other than going through the courts. The Providence City Council established a Juvenile Hearing Board (JHB) to help keep first-time offenders out of the justice system. Instead of going to court and serving time, a panel would prescribe incarceration alternatives. 

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