The Red Sox win big, politics never takes a holiday, and the calendar turns to November, marking the one-year mark until Rhode Island's next general election. Thanks for stopping by. As always, feel free to send me tips and feedback at idonnis (at) ripr (org) and to follow my short takes via Twitter. Let's head in.

The Providence Journal is reporting that 11 employees have been laid off, including eight full-time employees in the newsroom, in the newspaper's latest round of cost-cutting.

The layoffs were expected after a recent buyout attracted less interest than the target set by management.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Tracy Breton worked her final day on the job at the Providence Journal last Friday after covering courts and trials for 40 years. Breton was part of the investigative team that won a 1994 Pulitzer Prize for the ProJo, and she covered the downfall of two Rhode Island Supreme Court chief justices, Joseph Bevilacqua and Thomas Fay. Breton sat down to talk about her four decades of covering the courts and her future plans.

Twelve Providence Journal employees -- four in the news department and eight in advertising -- have agreed to take the company's latest buyout. The Providence Newspaper Guild expects the newspaper to move ahead with layoffs, since it hoped to eliminate about 30 positions.

In the latest in a series of buy-out offers in recent years, Providence Journal management says it will eliminate about 30 jobs unless enough employees decide to make an early departure.

Reporter John Hill, president of the Providence Newspaper Guild, says the news was conveyed to the union earlier today. "It's going to hurt," Hill says. "There's not a lot left to cut. Morale is terrible."

By most measures, a September 1973 strike by workers at the Providence Journal and Evening Bulletin was a failure. By voting to end the strike, newspaper employees agreed to accept the very contract they had rejected two weeks earlier. Some members of the Providence Newspaper Guild lost their jobs. Publication of the Journal and Bulletin continued uninterrupted through the strike.

Summer is starting to slip from our grasp, sparking the trail to the hotter political season to come. Thanks for stopping by. As always, feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org and to follow my short missives on Twitter. Let's head in:

Welcome back to my Friday column. As always you can reach me at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org. Let's get started.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

After 28 years at the Providence Journal, investigative reporter Mike Stanton is leaving Rhode Island's statewide daily for a teaching job at the University of Connecticut. Stanton sat down to talk about his time at the ProJo, some of his favorite stories, and the future of investigative reporting


For sportswriter-turned-investigative reporter Mike Stanton, finding a good lead -- on one occasion in the '90s, at least -- didn't require more than a visit with his friends in the Providence Journal's sports department.

Welcome back to my Friday politics + media column. As always, you can reach me at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org. Let's head in.

In The Prince of Providence, his gripping account of the life and times of Vincent A.

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The long-sought trial of James "Whitey" Bulger in US District Court in Boston offers a great example of how Twitter can carry the drama of legal action to a far bigger audience. Tweets from a bevy of top crime reporters, including WPRI-TV's Tim White, have offered a minute-by-minute account of the scene as the former fugitive mobster faces justice.

The Gannett Company is buying the Belo Corporation, the Dallas-based entity that owns 20 television stations, for $1.5 billion. Belo Corporation became a separate company in 2008 from A.H. Belo, the owner of the Providence Journal.

The AP reports: