Medicaid

RIPR FILE PHOTO

Sometimes it’s hard to figure who’s in charge at the Rhode Island Statehouse. This year isn’t one of those times, as RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay explains. 

Courtesy of Whitehouse Office

Rhode Island’s U.S. Senators are weighing in on the Republican health care proposal, unveiled publicly for the first time Thursday. The legislation is the culmination of a years-long attempt by Republican lawmakers to repeal with Obamacare, which they say has driven up health care costs for Americans.

The American Health Care Act narrowly passed in the U.S. House Thursday. The bill had received only one vote more than the 216 required to move on to the Senate. The bill repeals most of former President Barack Obama’s signature health care law, the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. Under Obamacare, Rhode Island was able to insure more than 100,000 residents through Medicaid expansion.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A report released Wednesday found more than 1,200 Rhode Island families were unable to receive food stamp benefits in a timely manner in March. The issues come as the state continues to work out a new digital benefits system.

The numbers come from the state Department of Human Services. The report is required as a part of settlement with the American Civil Liberties Union of Rhode Island over the botched rollout of a system for administering human service benefits known as UHIP.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island health officials are busy analyzing the potential impacts of the Republican plan to replace Obamacare. Proposed funding cuts to Medicaid  - the health insurance program for the poor - could mean covering fewer people or reducing payments to health care providers.

File photo

Free bus rides for seniors and disabled Medicaid users end Wednesday. These riders will now pay fifty cents a ride. But the state Department of Elderly Affairs may be able to help offset some of the cost.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Health and Human Services make up a little more than 40 percent of Governor Gina Raimondo’s proposed 2018 budget. There are no huge surprises in this year’s recommendations, but much uncertainty over the fate of federal health care funding.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Since the launch of the Rhode Island’s trouble social services system, UHIP, many nursing homes have gone without payment for Medicaid patients. Owed for months of care, many administrators are concerned they won’t be able to go without payment for much longer.

Megan Hall / RIPR

As Republicans prepare to repeal the Affordable Care Act without a clear replacement, many Rhode Islanders are concerned about their future. Freelancers, artists, and adjunct professors are in a particularly precarious position, because they don’t have access to employer-sponsored health insurance. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

One day after the start of Rhode Island's new General Assembly session, a group of lawmakers, religious leaders and advocates for the poor planned to demonstrate at the Statehouse. The Rhode Island Interfaith Coalition to Reduce Poverty organizes the annual event to encourage lawmakers to take up issues affecting low-income Rhode Islanders.

Though largely ceremonial, the event is usually attended by high-ranking lawmakers, including the Governor.

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island, Dec. 13

Dec 13, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here what’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Dec. 13:

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

UPDATE: Gov. Gina Raimondo has appointed Tom Guthlein Acting Associate Director of Program Operations at DHS to oversee the customer service team. Director Melba Depeña-Affigne’s role has not changed. 

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island, Nov. 29

Nov 29, 2016
Memorial Hospital

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Nov. 29:

MEDICAID: Rhode Island has been awarded about $130 million dollars from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid to continue overhauling its Medicaid program. 

RI Awarded $130M To Continue Medicaid 'Reinvention'

Nov 28, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island has been awarded $130 million dollars over the next five years from the federal government to continue its work overhauling Medicaid. The health insurance program for the poor serves nearly one in three Rhode Islanders. The money is earmarked for efforts that pay for better quality care instead of the quantity of care.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Sen. Josh Miller (D-Cranston) has had a front row seat during the implementation of Obamacare in Rhode Island. Now, the prospect of a Trump presidency is creating uncertainty among proponents of the law. 

Pages