New England

Aaron Read / RIPR

A coalition of researchers from Rhode Island’s colleges and universities have released another round of reports on the state’s economy. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what will happen to the latest round of research.

If Rhode Island were a bench, it would splinter under the weight of all the blue-ribbon commissions and consultant-generated reports that have for decades weighed in on what ails our state’s economy.


Rhode Island falls short providing adequate affordable housing to its lower-income residents.  The report comes from the advocacy non-profit National Low Income Housing Coalition.

According to the study, Rhode Islanders must earn at least $18.49 an hour to afford an average two-bedroom apartment. The minimum wage is currently nine dollars an hour, though efforts are underway to raise that to $10.10.

Hans-Petter Fjeld / Wikimedia Commons

In regional news, the Gulf of Maine Atlantic salmon, known as the “king of fish,” is one of eight marine species most at risk for extinction in the near future. The fisheries division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration just announced a new campaign to beef up efforts to help these endangered species survive.

NOAA Fisheries biologist Tara Trinko Lake said the Atlantic salmon were once abundant as far south as Connecticut, but they started to decline in the late 1800s from dams, overfishing, and pollution.

Wikimedia Commons

The NFL lawyer who investigated the deflation of footballs by the Patriots last season says he has direct evidence quarterback Tom Brady knew about the incident.

Following the investigation the NFL hit Brady with a four game suspension, which has some fan scratching their heads.

Bradford Griffin from Woonsocket said it seems unfair to give Brady a four-game suspension when another player was suspended for just two games in a case involving domestic violence.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Rhode Island’s new state-funded preschool program is expensive, but it may be high quality. That’s according to a new study from the National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers University.

Courtesy of Northeast Fisheries Science Center / NOAA

Oceans are becoming more acidic as they absorb all the carbon emissions humans release into the air. And it could impact the Atlantic seaboard’s scallop industry, which brings in hundreds of millions of dollars. A team of researchers is working to predict just how bad the damage might be.

Researchers with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the nonprofit Ocean Conservancy unveiled a computer program that analyzes data on changes in the ocean, the scallop population, and the economy.

Five New England governors met yesterday in Hartford, Connecticut, to talk about increasing the region’s energy supply. No solutions are set in stone, but environmental advocates are concerned proposals rely too heavily on natural gas.

Gov. Gina Raimondo said this winter New England’s average wholesale electricity prices were significantly higher than neighboring regions. And those high prices are tough on consumers and businesses. Raimondo said at the regional meeting, the governors committed to provide relief.

RIPR File Photo

Gov. Gina Raimondo will meet with other New England governors in Hartford, Conn., tomorrow to discuss the region’s energy problems.

At a private roundtable, New England governors plan to explore solutions to a number of challenges: the rising prices of electricity, limited pipeline capacity, and the aging electricity grid.

Courtesy of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Department of Commerce

The fisheries division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has exempted some Gulf of Maine fishermen from emergency fishing restrictions it issued last November. A fisheries analyst said the latest compromise still meets the goal to protect the region’s cod, but not everyone agrees.

NOAA Fisheries issued fishing trip limits last November that would reduce the Gulf of Maine cod catch by 20 metric tons. Fisheries policy analyst William Whitmore said fishermen came back with an alternate proposal.

In case you haven’t had enough Super Bowl hype, here’s one more thing for New England fans to chew on: Roger Staubach, the Dallas Cowboys quarterback who was MVP of Super Bowl Vi in 1972, is predicting the Pats to defeat Seattle Sunday.

Staubach, who is now in the commercial real estate business as executive chairman of JLL, said in a news release that he expects a close game but that New England will emerge the winner.

Gov. Lincoln Chafee and other leaders have gathered at Slater Mill in Pawtucket this afternoon for a ceremonial signing of the Affordable Clean Energy Security Act, an energy bill the governor signed into law earlier this summer.

The act gives Rhode Island an opportunity to work with other New England states to address volatile electricity prices. Last winter, the New England region spent $5 billion in energy costs, nearly as much as the region spent for the entire 2012 calendar year.

As always Independence Day travel is expected to be heavy. This year will see about 41 million people moving around the country.

That’s about two percent higher than last year’s rate, which may be in part due to the holiday falling on a Friday.

In New England nearly three percent more people are expected to travel. David Raposa of AAA of Southern New England attributes the higher travel rate in New England to one thing: the region’s small size.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

New England governors met this Tuesday, in a one-hour closed session to discuss the region’s response to opioid problem.

New Englanders spent $5 billion in electricity last winter, compared to $5.2 billion for all of 2012. That's why each of the New England states has introduced legislation in their respective states to address the problem of rising electricity prices. But environmental advocacy groups are worried this regional collaboration would promote unnecessary natural gas projects.

Ocean State Job Lot Donating Thousands Of Pounds Of Food

Mar 25, 2014

Ocean State Job Lot is making a large food donation as part of its 2014 Three Square Meals Program. 78 trucks are hauling 600,000 pounds of food to 13 food banks around New England and New York.

Ocean State Job Lot's head of marketing David Sarlitto says Job Lot's customers have played an important role in the donation's success.