New England

ALEX POLEZHAEV / CREATIVE COMMONS

About 65 percent of the sun will be covered in Providence when the eclipse takes its maximum effect at 2:47 Monday afternoon.

kestaatz / flickr

Some New England states are expected to have higher than normal tides Monday because of the total solar eclipse, according to a Washington-state-based tides expert. 


Avory Brookins / RIPR

Former head of the Environmental Protection Agency's New England regional office is worried that President Donald Trump's proposed budget could put Rhode Island's air and water quality at risk. 

Aaron Read / RIPR

A record-breaking 2.3 million New Englanders are expected to be hitting the road this Fourth of July weekend, driving more than 50 miles from home.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

State Attorney General Peter Kilmartin is the latest to join a bipartisan investigation into pharmaceutical companies’ marketing tactics of prescription opioids.

RYAN CARON KING / WNPR

  Once plentiful in New England’s rivers, native Atlantic salmon have since all but disappeared.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Those early hints of spring can call to a gardener like a siren song. Yet the urge to get one’s seeds into dirt can be dangerous: most seedlings won’t survive a single frost. To help with that, gardeners use 30-year averages that predict when the last frost will probably occur. The thing is, in New England, climate change has temperatures rising relatively quickly.

PETER BIENKOWSKI

More than a million Vietnamese came to the U.S. as refugees in the years after their civil war ended. More than 65 thousand Vietnamese make New England home. Now another massive wave — dislocated Syrians — are seeking safety.

Ryan Caron King / NENC

Inside a cavernous glass-and-steel chamber that overlooks Portland's busy waterfront, dozens of immigrants are about to become U.S. citizens.

Shannon Dooling / WBUR

 

Muslims in America are the subject of heated political debate. But they account for a very small number of elected politicians in New England.

RIPR File Photo

As wet, heavy snow whipped southern New England, thousands of National Grid customers found themselves without power. At one point Thursday, nearly 18,000 Rhode Island homes and businesses were experiencing outages. That number shrank to about 5,000 customers by 7 p.m.

National Grid spokesman David Graves said the utility company  had prepared, putting crews in place in advance of the storm.  

“We’ll have crews who’ll be working through the day and into the evening hours, and then a second shift coming on at 10 pm,” said Graves.

Lisa Quinones for NENC


Ryan von Linden/New York Department of Environmental Conservation / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

New research from the University of New Hampshire suggests some bat species have developed a resistance to a devastating fungal disease known as white-nose syndrome.

Since the white-nose syndrome was introduced to North America from Europe about 10 years ago, it has killed roughly 90 percent of the little brown bat population in the northeast.

MICHAEL TSARION / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE VIA FLICKR

National Grid is withdrawing its application for the project informally known as the pipeline tax.

Piping Plovers Could Be Harder To Find This Summer

Jan 5, 2017
Joel Trick / USFWS / Creative Commons License

Bird lovers may see a lot less of the Piping Plover on beaches in Rhode Island and around New England this summer. The little black-and-white shorebirds’ winter habitat in the Bahamas was hit hard by Hurricane Matthew last year, and that may have taken a heavy toll on the birds.

Piping Plovers were already considered threatened in Connecticut -- they’ve been hurt by shoreline development and careless beachgoers. But their winter vacation spot in the Bahamas has no human development, just thousands of other piping plovers from all over North America.

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