Nicholas Mattiello

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The House Finance Committee is expected to vote Thursday on a new budget for the fiscal year beginning July first. The legislature usually makes a series of changes to the spending plan submitted by Gov. Gina Raimondo.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

A bill to eliminate the car tax is scheduled for its first hearing in the House Finance Committee Tuesday. Lawmakers will likely hear arguments for and against the proposal, but they are not expected to vote.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

A bill to begin the phaseout of the state’s car tax is expected to be introduced Tuesday. Eliminating the tax is the top priority for House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A state Senate committee will take testimony Wednesday on a bill that would create a line-item veto in Rhode Island.

The Ocean State is one of just a handful of states that lack the line-item veto. Supporters say it would improve government accountability by allowing the governor to veto individual budget items.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island’s total revenue is off the mark by $43 million, or a bit less than 2 percent, for the first nine months of fiscal 2017. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

The House Judiciary Committee is expected to hold a hearing on a bill that would allow driver’s licenses for the undocumented Tuesday.  

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Twelve new state reps and four new senators will be sworn in when the General Assembly begins its new session Tuesday. House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello and Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed are expected to be formally re-elected to their leadership positions.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo is responding to Monday statehouse demonstration, where more than 100 peopled called for state lawmakers to pledge action against some of the President-elect’s campaign promises. The group known as “Resist Hate RI” delivered a letter Raimondo.

In the letter, the progressive group demands that the Governor, Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed, and House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello, protect rights they see as threatened by Donald Trump’s administration. Governor Raimondo responded with a lengthy post on social media.

John Bender / RIPR

The state Board of Elections Wednesday night declined a request to delay the certification of votes in a high-profile legislative race. 

WPRI-TV

Democratic House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello and his Republican rival, Steven Frias, squared off during a televised debate Friday. Cranston voters will pick between the two candidates on Tuesday.

Mattiello and Frias fought on a series of issues during the 30-minute debate on WPRI-TV, Channel 12. Mattiello says tax cuts he’s supported have moved up Rhode Island about seven ranks from the bottom in a national business survey. Frias responded by saying that’s like going from an F grade to an F-minus.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR


Aaron Read / RIPR

Rhode Island is among a small number of states that don’t have a gubernatorial line-item veto.Advocates are pressing lawmakers to take up the issue in the next legislative session.

Supporters say the line-item veto brings more accountability to the budget process. They say that’s especially important in Rhode Island, which has a particularly powerful legislature.

John Bender / RIPR

House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello says he plans to make car taxes a priority in the next legislative session. Mattiello held a press conference Tuesday in Cranston to discuss his legislative goals. The Democrat faces a Republican challenger, Steven Frias, this November.

Mattiello said the car tax has long been a thorn in the side of his Cranston constituents, and said this session the General Assembly will be able to take up the issue.

The executive editor of The Providence Journal said it's "a mistaken assumption" to believe that Katherine Gregg, who has covered the Statehouse for the ProJo for more than 30 years, won't be returning to her longtime beat.

According to an email obtained by RI Public Radio, Dave Butler writes, "Kathy is on a month's vacation, then will take a much-needed break during what looks like a slow time in the Statehouse. She'll work on projects and other things. We've not said she won't return to the Statehouse. That's a mistaken assumption."

RIPR FILE

While many Ocean State voters are more focused on August vacations than politics, candidates for the legislature are knocking on doors, appearing at coffee hours and pleading for votes at taverns and ethnic clubs.

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