nonviolence

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Teny Gross moved to Rhode Island in 2001 to lead a new organization dedicated to reducing violence in Providence. Fourteen years later, Gross will work his last day Friday at the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence. The 49-year-old Israeli native is leaving to start a new nonviolence group in Chicago, although Gross says he’ll continue to spend some time in Rhode Island. He sat down to reflect on his time leading the institute and efforts to reduce violence in Rhode Island.

Visitors from Chicago and Newark, New Jersey, are completing on Friday a two-day visit examining the work of the Institute for the Study and Practice of Nonviolence.

Christopher Mallette heads a three-year-old program called the Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy. Mallette says the Chicago strategy, like the one in Providence, utilizes street workers who try to mediate disputes and prevent violent conflicts.