One Square Mile: Block Island

Photo by: IAN DONNIS

PROVIDENCE, RI – As part of our `One Square Mile' reports on Block Island RIPR talks with Block Island top elected official First Warden Kim Gaffett. Her family has deep roots on the island, and Gaffett has been interested in local government since she was a schoolgirl. As she told Rhode Island Public Radio's Ian Donnis on a recent drive around Block Island, the demands facing the island change dramatically with the seasons.

Photo by: CATHERINE WELCH

PROVIDENCE, RI – Turns out that on Block Island, nobody really knows the address of where they work or live because there are no addresses on Block Island. This intrigued Rhode Island Public Radio's Catherine Welch so as part of our series One Square Mile: Block Island, Catherine sat down with editor of The Block Island Times, Pippa Jack, to find out how anyone on the island gets mail.

Photo by: KRISTIN GOURLAY

PROVIDENCE, RI – As part of our series One Square Mile: Block Island, we've been exploring the rise of diseases spread by ticks, which are a big problem on the island. But the problem is spreading to the mainland. RIPR health care reporter Kristin Gourlay speaks with our Morning Edition host Chuck Hinman about the rising threat of babesiosis in the region's blood supply.

Photo by: Elisabeth Harrison

PROVIDENCE, RI – On Block Island, a single public school serves all of the island's year-round residents. Kindergartners and high school seniors have classes in the same building and eat lunch in the same cafeteria. It's a close community, but it's also one of the most expensive public schools in the state.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

PROVIDENCE, RI – There's another, even more serious disease than Lyme on Block Island. That disease is called babesiosis. Like Lyme disease, babesiosis will make you think you have the flu - fever, chills, body aches, sweats. But if your immune system is already weak, it can kill you. It's spread by a parasite. And you can only get it from the bite of an infected deer tick. Now, most people try to avoid them. But for Lindsay Rollend, they're a living.

"So this is our tickery!"

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