OSM

One Square Mile: Johnston: One Hour Special

Feb 19, 2017

Let us tale  you on a journey: a journey to Johnston, Rhode Island. It’s the focus of this year’s One Square Mile. Every year we gather up the newsroom and wrestle over which community to focus on for our annual series “One Square Mile.” But this year, the choice seemed clear. Democrat Hillary Clinton won Rhode Island last November, but in Johnston, Donald Trump beat her by 14 points. That’s the biggest swing for any Rhode Island community. Why did this blue town turn red? Plus, did you know Johnston has one of the highest concentrations of Italian Americans in the entire country?

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

In early 1860, Abraham Lincoln came to Rhode Island gathering support for his presidential campaign. He stopped in Providence and Woonsocket. and there's a rumor that he also visited Burrillville's Western Hotel, a popular stagecoach stop on the Douglas Turnpike. For the final installment in our series One Square Mile: Burrillville, Rhode Island Public Radio's Chuck Hinman takes us to the Western Hotel, in the village of Nasonville, in the town's southeast corner. It turns out, this hotel has some interesting history, both real and imagined.  

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

This week, a Burrillville couple sued Warner Brothers over the movie “The Conjuring,” claiming it has turned their lives into a nightmare. The couple lives in the house that the supernatural thriller is based on. They claim their peace and quiet has been ruined by trespassers trying to check out their supposedly haunted property. Well, it turns out that tales about “The Conjuring” house are among several ghost stories told in Burrillville. 

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave chat with Burrillville Economic Development Director Thomas Kravitz about encouraging growth while maintaining the town's rural character and historic mill villages.

 

This week's episode of The Bottom Line is part of our series One Square Mile: Burrillville.

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 p.m.

    

Addieville East Farm in Burrillville, Rhode Island is a haven for sport hunting, and has gained an international reputation. And as part of our Series One Square Mile: Burrillville, Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender reports, running this massive operation is labor of love.

Elisabeth Harrison

School resource officers, police officers who are embedded in public schools, have become commonplace in Rhode Island. But the practice is under new scrutiny after a controversial incident in South Carolina, where an officer dragged a high school student from her chair, flipping the student and her desk onto the floor in the process.

In Burrillville, Officer David Beauchemin takes what I would describe as a community policing approach to the district's five public schools.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

There’s an epidemic of opioid addiction and overdose unfolding across Rhode Island right now, and Burrillville, a small town in the northwestern corner of the state has been particularly hard hit.

Jesse M. Smith Library in Harrisville
RIPR

Join Rhode Island Public Radio for a listening party for our series One Square Mile: Burrillville at the Jesse M. Smith Memorial Library in Harrisville!  Hear highlights from the series, meet the local reporters who produced the stories, and share your stories with us!

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

This week, we bring you the sights and sounds of Burrillville, Rhode Island, with our occasional series One Square Mile. Today we head to Spring Lake, in the village of Glendale with Rhode Island Public Radio's morning host Chuck Hinman.

This local watering hole is one of the closest things the town has to a public beach.

John Bender / RIPR

Today, Rhode Island Public Radio kicks off a week-long series we call `One Square Mile’ where we focus  on one of Rhode Island’s communities. This week the focus is Burrillville. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay brings us the story of Austin T. Levy, an unconventional industrialist, who built up one of the mill villages that now make up one of Burrillville’s central neighborhoods.

John Bender / RIPR

Hockey runs deep in Burrillville. The town’s junior hockey league started in the early 1950s making it one of the oldest youth hockey leagues in the country. The town also boasts one of the oldest public rinks attached to a high school. Today, families continue a tradition of hockey prowess.

As part of our series One Square Mile: Burrillville, Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender spent some time at the local hockey rink.

Catherine Welch / RIPR

In our series One Square Mile we're exploring Narragansett Bay: what's lurking in the bay, its rich natural resources, how it affects the state's economy and the lives lived on the bay.  One of those lives is that of a tour guide who for years has delighted ferry passengers with fascinating stories of the many lighthouses in and around the bay.  

At Quonset Point, the ferry called The Ava Pearl idles along the dock as passengers line up to board. A man with a shock of white hair stands near the front of the line.

One Square Mile: Kayaking Narragansett Bay

Oct 10, 2014
Catherine Welch / RIPR

All this week we’re looking we’re looking at one of the Ocean State’s most visible resources: Narragansett Bay, with a series we call One Square Mile. There are plenty of ways for residents and tourists alike to get out onto the water: sailboats, surfboards, even jet skis.  

Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender went kayaking to get a feel for why people choose to pick up the paddle.

Catherine Welch / RIPR

We’re extending summer just a little longer this week with our series One Square Mile focused on Narragansett Bay. Now we offer a little poetry. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Catherine Welch caught up with Rick Benjamin, the state’s poet laureate, who wrote a poem about the bay for our series.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you. news@ripr.org

Newport Historical Society

We continue our series One Square Mile: Narragansett Bay with a look at the bay’s role in the slave trade. Tens of thousands of slaves were traded on ships out of Narragansett Bay, more than any other part of North America.

Newport was at one time the largest slave-trading port in the region. To find out more, Rhode Island Public Radio's education reporter Elisabeth Harrison met Newport history teacher Matt Boyle at Bannisters Wharf, which was built by a merchant involved in the slave trade. She asked him what it would have looked like in mid-18th Century.

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