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Democratic House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello and his Republican rival, Steven Frias, squared off during a televised debate Friday. Cranston voters will pick between the two candidates on Tuesday.

Mattiello and Frias fought on a series of issues during the 30-minute debate on WPRI-TV, Channel 12. Mattiello says tax cuts he’s supported have moved up Rhode Island about seven ranks from the bottom in a national business survey. Frias responded by saying that’s like going from an F grade to an F-minus.

Marc Nozell / Flickr

National polling shows a tightening race for presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. In Rhode Island, Clinton is expected to win, but Republicans say don’t count Trump out just yet.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR


Ian Donnis / RIPR

Next week voters go to the polls to pick the next president of the United States. Rhode Island voters also vote on several statewide issues, including the proposal to build a casino in Tiverton.

As part of our Rhody Votes ’16 coverage Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender headed to Tiverton, where residents are seemed lukewarm about the casino.

John Bender / RIPR

Nearly 30,000 Rhode Islanders have applied to vote by mail in the presidential election, up from roughly 23,000 in 2012. Those numbers from the office of Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea. Mail-in ballots are counted on Election Night. Gorbea says local boards of canvassers help to guard against vote fraud.

“The mail ballot comes in and is reviewed by the local boards of canvassers and if there are any kinds of discrepancies that seem to trigger a concern, they’re taken up by the state Board of Elections,” said Gorbea.

John Bender / RIPR

A guide to what's on your ballot this year.

This is a general presidential election year, meaning the top choice on your ballot is for president of the United States. But that’s not the only decision you’ll be asked to make on this year’s ballot in Rhode Island. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won Rhode Island's Democratic primary by more than 10 points, beating rival Hillary Clinton with the help of grass-roots and student-led efforts. But Sanders went on to lose the nomination, leaving his most ardent fans in something of a quandary.

Dank Depot/flickr / Creative Commons License

A new poll from Boston public radio station WBUR finds growing support for a ballot measure that would legalize recreational marijuana. In Rhode Island, advocates have pushed for a similar measure, but some local lawmakers say they will wait to see what happens in the Bay State before taking up the issue.

Jill Kaufman / NEPR/NENC

Louisiana and Texas permitted early voting in 1921. It’s a slow moving trend, but it’s definitely taking hold. Thirty-seven states now provide some kind of opportunity for registered voters to cast ballots before Election Day. Massachusetts is the newest kid on the block with in-person early voting starting Monday, October 24.

In Springfield, Massachusetts, the city’s election commissioner, Gladys Oyola, said she’s been preparing for “the election before the election” since 2014, when then-Governor Deval Patrick signed early voting into Massachusetts law.

RIPR FILE

Republican Cranston Mayor Allan Fung met Democratic challenger Michael Sepe during a televised debate over the weekend on WPRI-TV's  "Newsmakers" program.

During the exchange, Sepe pointed to issues that have plagued City Hall under Fung’s tenure, including a State Police report criticizing the management of the city police department following a parking ticketing scandal.

RIPR FILE

The presidential election is now a little more than two weeks away, and we’ve been hearing from various voters across the nation and the state. Millennials – people now in their twenties and thirties – remain a coveted voting bloc.

As we continue our Rhody Votes ’16 election coverage, we bring you the voices of local college students at Brown University and Rhode Island College weighing in on the presidential race, and the issues they’re most concerned about.

Aaron Read / RIPR

Rhode Island is among a small number of states that don’t have a gubernatorial line-item veto.Advocates are pressing lawmakers to take up the issue in the next legislative session.

Supporters say the line-item veto brings more accountability to the budget process. They say that’s especially important in Rhode Island, which has a particularly powerful legislature.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Ahead of the presidential election, we’ve been hearing from voters across the country and the state. Analysts have remarked on the heated rhetoric of this year’s elections; specifically language used to describe immigrants, refugees and Muslim Americans. 

Patrick Semansky / AP

Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton face off in the final presidential debate Wednesday night at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, is live annotating the debate. Portions of the debate with added analysis are highlighted, followed by context and fact check from NPR reporters and editors.

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Do you and a close friend or family member disagree about the presidential election? How do you handle conversations at the dinner table or the hardware store when they turn political? What about social media? We want to hear from you! Email your stories of the 2016 presidential race to news@ripr.org.

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