Politics

Political news

Gage Skidmore / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE

Rhode Island lawmakers reacted Tuesday to the resignation of Michael Flynn as national security advisor. 

John Bender

Rhode Island Public Radio produced dozens of stories during the 2016 presidential race, following voters' views of the candidates, the issues, local races and the outcomes of both the primary and the general election. Our coverage included a combination of feature reporting, newscast stories, commentary and interviews. 

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump tweets a lot. With tens of millions of followers on Twitter, Trump proposes policy, shares his latest actions and reacts to the news. But 140 characters rarely gives the full context. Here, we attempt to do just that for key tweets.

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RI ACLU Files FOIA Over Travel Ban Implementation

Feb 2, 2017
RI ACLU

The Rhode Island ACLU is demanding details from U.S. Customs and Border officials on how they are handling President Donald Trump’s travel ban. The move is a coordinated freedom of information request with multiple states.

Trump's Travel Ban Hits Rhode Island Refugees

Feb 2, 2017
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Since President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority nations, many refugees are in limbo. They’re waiting abroad, and some of their family members are waiting for them here.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Democrat Hillary Clinton won the state of Rhode Island in November, but then-candidate Donald Trump beat her by 14 points in Johnston.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

After false statements from President Donald Trump’s press secretary about the size of the inauguration crowds, Democrats are scratching their heads over how to deal with the new administration. U.S. Senator Sheldon Whitehouse said journalists have their work cut out for them.

Barbara Quill

Thousands of women, men and families rallied on the south lawn of the Rhode Island State House Saturday in a show of support for the Women's March on Washington. 

John Bender / RIPR

A small group gathered in Warwick at the state Republican Party's headquarters to watch Friday's inauguration ceremony for President Donald Trump.

The New Year has begun, and that means it’s time for a new legislative session on Smith Hill. Lawmakers are expected to take up a range of issues, from car taxes to a budget deficit, and perhaps recreational marijuana. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison sat down for a preview of the legislative session with our political analyst Scott MacKay.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Twelve new state reps and four new senators will be sworn in when the General Assembly begins its new session Tuesday. House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello and Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed are expected to be formally re-elected to their leadership positions.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

After losing a 2014 run for governor, Republican Allan Fung returned to Rhode Island's third-largest city to face a brewing scandal within his police department. His office was roundly criticized in a state police report, which provided fodder for his opponents during his most recent reelection bid. Despite that, Fung easily won with 68 percent of the vote.

Fung said infrastructure repair will be one of his major priorities during his final term.

RIPR FILE

The state Supreme Court is allowing a recall effort to continue against Providence City Councilor Kevin Jackson. Jackson faces charges of embezzlement and misusing campaign contributions.

Councilor Jackson wanted the the state Supreme Court to block the effort to knock him out of office. But the court has declined to review lower court rulings in the case.

The recall effort against Jackson began after he was charged with misappropriating more than $127,000 from a youth track and field group. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

RI Electoral College Casts Votes For Clinton, Kaine

Dec 19, 2016
Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

In Rhode Island, four electors unanimously cast their votes for Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine for the presidential ticket, after they were escorted into the House Chamber to cast their ballots Monday afternoon.  

Earlier in the day, protesters demonstrated outside the Statehouse, calling for electors across the country to join forces and halt the election of Republican Donald Trump.

State Electoral College President Clay Pell said Rhode Island's electors heeded the call of the majority of voters in the Ocean State. 

“I voted for Hillary on November 8th and together with Rhode Islanders across the state, we voted overwhelmingly for Hillary," said Pell. "So for me, there was no question of voting for someone other than Hillary, because she had the will of the people.”

Pell said it’s sad Clinton will not take office, but he’s proud to be a part of the Electoral College. He said the system is imperfect, but electors must follow the rules. 

After casting votes, State Rep. Grace Diaz, one of the state's four electors, initiated a call for a bipartisan committee to investigate suspected Russian interference in the election.  Pell said this is an effort to protect the integrity of American elections in the future.

“This is not about changing the outcome," said Pell. "This is about defending the democratic will of the people. President-elect Trump is the president-elect. I believe in the peaceful transfer of power. But I also believe in making sure that he stands with the intelligence community and the American people and not with the Russian government.”

Pell said it’s not too late to investigate how Russians interfered. He said the American people have a right to know more about the government intelligence that concluded Russia swayed the elections by hacking and releasing emails of important members of the Democratic National Committee (DNC).

 

Protesters Brave The Cold With Message For Electoral College 

With chants of, "Democracy, yes! Donald Trump, no!" a small group of demonstrators ignored sub-freezing temperatures, and little chance of success, to make their views known outside the Rhode Island Statehouse Monday morning.

In a surprising revelation, U.S. Sen. Jack Reed, the ranking Democrat on the Senate Armed Services Committee, says he first learned of suspected Russian hacking during the presidential campaign from media reports.

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