ProJo

For more than 40 years, Bob Kerr worked at the Providence Journal, where he was beloved by many readers for his columns about the people and the issues that animate Rhode Island. Recently, he’s been thinking back on his time at the ProJo.

Hilary Horton was my editor when I wrote the local column in the Providence Journal 20 years ago.  We would get together in the late afternoon, looking for the better word, cleaning up the clutter, finding what the heck I was trying to say.  The column was always the better for it.

The 2014 Rhode Island campaign for governor began in earnest tonight as Democratic primary aspirants Angel Taveras, Clay Pell and Gina Raimondo met in a live televised debate on WPRI-TV that was far more remarkable for policy agreements than disagreements or the sharp, thrust-and-parry exchanges emblematic of Democratic primaries of yore.

After a long, strange trip, Election 2012 is in the books. It’s been a long week, so sit back and relax with my latest edition of TGIF. Your comments are welcome, as always, at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org.

The ProJo continues to bleed print subscribers. According to the latest numbers from the Audit Bureau of Circulations, crunched by WPRI’s Ted Nesi, the daily Journal sold just 83,733 print copies on weekdays between April and Sept. 30, the period covered by the latest report. That is down by 6,352 from the figures reported 12 months ago.

On Sundays, the most lucrative advertising day of the week for newspapers, circulation dropped to 117,784, a decline of 11,240 since the September, 2011 report. Saturday circulation was also down.

The ProJo, which is cutting employees once again, is really penny-pinching with this one. The state’s largest newspaper is ending the `Papers for Patients’  program, according to a letter from Lori Gardnier, director of consumer sales for the ProJo, to hospital officials.

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