providence journal

Twelve Providence Journal employees -- four in the news department and eight in advertising -- have agreed to take the company's latest buyout. The Providence Newspaper Guild expects the newspaper to move ahead with layoffs, since it hoped to eliminate about 30 positions.

In the latest in a series of buy-out offers in recent years, Providence Journal management says it will eliminate about 30 jobs unless enough employees decide to make an early departure.

Reporter John Hill, president of the Providence Newspaper Guild, says the news was conveyed to the union earlier today. "It's going to hurt," Hill says. "There's not a lot left to cut. Morale is terrible."

By most measures, a September 1973 strike by workers at the Providence Journal and Evening Bulletin was a failure. By voting to end the strike, newspaper employees agreed to accept the very contract they had rejected two weeks earlier. Some members of the Providence Newspaper Guild lost their jobs. Publication of the Journal and Bulletin continued uninterrupted through the strike.

Welcome back to my Friday column. As always you can reach me at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org. Let's get started.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

After 28 years at the Providence Journal, investigative reporter Mike Stanton is leaving Rhode Island's statewide daily for a teaching job at the University of Connecticut. Stanton sat down to talk about his time at the ProJo, some of his favorite stories, and the future of investigative reporting

.

For sportswriter-turned-investigative reporter Mike Stanton, finding a good lead -- on one occasion in the '90s, at least -- didn't require more than a visit with his friends in the Providence Journal's sports department.

Welcome back to my Friday politics + media column. As always, you can reach me at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org. Let's head in.

In The Prince of Providence, his gripping account of the life and times of Vincent A.

Mike Stanton, who has spearheaded a lot of the Providence Journal's investigative reporting for more than two decades, is leaving the paper to pursue other opportunities.

In a tweet Monday afternoon, Stanton says he's leaving the ProJo to teach and write at the University of Connecticut. "Will always treasure my time here - the stories & scoundrels, but more important, the great friends," he added.

The Gannett Company is buying the Belo Corporation, the Dallas-based entity that owns 20 television stations, for $1.5 billion. Belo Corporation became a separate company in 2008 from A.H. Belo, the owner of the Providence Journal.

The AP reports:

Pages