Providence Police

John Bender / RIPR

In a surprise vote, the Providence City Council did not pass the so-called Community Safety Act during its meeting Thursday. Supporters say the community policing act will tamp down police profiling.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Jim Vincent, president of the Providence NAACP, joins Roundtable this week to discuss the transition in state Senate leadership, the impact that body cams might make on police-community relations, and Governor Raimondo's push for some good government measures.

US Attorney Peter Neronha stopped by our studio Thursday to talk about 38 Studios, immigration, targeting violent crime, and more.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR FILE

Providence police aren’t likely to expand their role in helping federal immigration officials. This comes as Homeland Security officials seek to employ local police departments in the ramped-up deportation of undocumented immigrants.

John Bender / RIPR

The Rhode Island chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union has penned a letter to the Providence City Council, urging them to veto the purchase of body cameras for city police. While the organization is in favor of the cameras, RI ACLU head Steve Brown said the police department hasn’t offered a clear path for public access to the footage.

After an internal police investigation, Providence officers will be disciplined and receive retraining over an incident in which an officer dragged a woman by the hair and punched her several times.

The arrest, which happened in May, was caught on cell phone video, but came to light only after Channel 10 brought the tape to police in July. 

John Bender / RIPR

The Providence Police hope to outfit all officers on patrol with body cameras within the next several months. But a new federal grant will only cover half of the cost.

The Providence Police department has received $375,000 in matching grants from the U.S. Department of Justice. But city must come up with an equal amount of money to outfit all 250 of its patrol officers with body cameras.

In addition to the cost of the cameras, the department must also pay for digital storage of the video.

John Bender / RIPR

More than 100 supporters gathered at Providence City Hall Wednesday evening for the first public hearing on a proposed ordinance known as the Community Safety Act.

The CSA seeks to reduce potential racial profiling by city law enforcement.

The ordinance includes 12 central points, several of which are variations on state law and the current the Providence police code of conduct. Most expand the definition of racial profiling and procedures for handling police stops, said community organizer Vanessa Flores-Maldonando.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Providence poet Christopher Johnson is one of 20 candidates for Poet Laureate of Rhode Island. He is also facing charges of assault, resisting arrest and disorderly conduct after an encounter last spring with a Providence police officer. Johnson wrote about that encounter earlier this month for Motif Magazine, in an essay called Walking While Black. He spoke to Rhode Island Public Radio’s Chuck Hinman about his case.

Will Hart / Wikimedia Commons

Providence residents expressed mixed reactions Friday to a pair of deadly shootings of black men by police and the Dallas shooter, who killed five officers and wounded six others at a protest of police brutality.

Taking a break from his job on a construction site on Providence's West Side, resident Emmanuel Davids said he wasn’t surprised when he found out about the shootings of black men by police in Minnesota and Louisiana.

Providence police officials say they will conduct a full review of the arrest of a woman, pulled by her hair and punched several times by an officer. 

RIPR file photo

A Providence police officer was scheduled for arraignment Friday after his arrest on charges of  breaking and entering and larceny involving a company that distributes newspapers for The Providence Journal.

Officer Jesse Ferrell, a 19-year veteran of the department, is accused of breaking into a distribution center and taking materials that are usually delivered inside the newspaper to home-delivery customers.

RI Hospital Acknowledges Delay In Reporting Assault

Feb 11, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island Hospital acknowledges there was a delay in providing the name of an employee suspected of assaulting a patient to the Providence Police. Hospital officials say they’re reviewing hospital practice to determine what caused the delay and prevent it from occurring in the future.

The employee is accused of inappropriately touching a patient. Hospital officials say they’re troubled by the allegation and will assist police with the criminal investigation.

RIPR FILE

As we celebrate the legacy of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders why we still haven’t made the progress that King envisioned.

Today is the day we honor King, the preacher and activist who pricked the conscience of a nation. 

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