Providence Public Safety

Screenshot via Providence Tax Assessor website

"No heat in house, no running water," wrote an inspector after visiting the apartment building at 110 Bowdoin Street, in the Olneyville section of Providence. "Issuing intent to condemn, house was a mess."

The report, signed January 3, 2018, went on to describe occupants relying on space heaters and propane torches for warmth, during one of the coldest periods in recent memory. There was an open electrical panel in the basement, the inspector noted. Residents were complaining of constant problems and frozen pipes.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR FILE

Providence police aren’t likely to expand their role in helping federal immigration officials. This comes as Homeland Security officials seek to employ local police departments in the ramped-up deportation of undocumented immigrants.

Intoxicated "frequent fliers" strain emergency services

Dec 12, 2012

Providence Public Safety Commissioner Steven Pare wants you to call 911 if you're having a real emergency. But he says most calls these days - more than 75 percent - aren't emergencies. And that's stretching city resources thin.

"Look, every time we send a rescue out on average to pick up a person anywhere in the city and transport them it's costing the taxpayer $550 dollars."