Providence

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Last night, friends and families gathered at a historically black church in Providence to honor the nine people who were murdered at a prayer meeting in Charleston, South Carolina. This interfaith service was both a memorial and a call for social justice. 

Eight clergy members from different churches walked down the aisle together at Olney Street Baptist Church before a racially mixed group of about 100 people.

Nine candles stood at an altar to honor the nine people killed in the Charleston church shooting.

RIPR file photo

Developer Arnold "Buff" Chace's Cornish Associates has completed its purchase of the historic Providence Journal building at 75 Fountain St. in downtown Providence, teaming up with Massachusetts-based Nordblom Company on the deal.

The purchase includes two parking lots at 78 Fountain St. and 1 Eddy St.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Rhode Island lawmakers are expected to wrap up the regular part of their 2015 session later this week. It remains unknown for now if legislators will return to hold a special session later this year.Governor Gina Raimondo is pressing lawmakers to back a plan to fund bridge improvements through new tolls on truck.

The state Trucking Association opposes the plan.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave debate property tax deals with attorney Nicholas Hemond, who works with the law firm Darrow-Everett. Their conversation includes efforts to standardize property tax breaks in Providence and spur development on the former I-195 land. 

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50pm.

RIPR FILE

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza wants to convince more college graduates to stay in the capital city. He’s launched a new initiative to reach out to young people.

He said the goal is to make living in Providence desirable to millennials.

“Per capita, we have the largest number of college graduates of any state in the country,” said Elorza. “These are the entrepreneurs, the civic leaders and they’re the employees of the future. So it’s a priority of mine to make sure that we retain them here.”

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