Courtesy RISD

The RISD museum has received a $2.5 million gift from the Rockefeller family.  The money will go to support the museum’s decorative arts department.

The decorative arts refer to objects which have practical uses as well as artistic value; such as furniture, silverware, and vases.   In addition to the monetary gift, David Rockefeller, is donating about 43 objects from his personal collection. Museum director John Smith said the most important items include some eighteenth century English furniture.


Charter school advocates packed the statehouse rotunda Wednesday to urge lawmakers to continue their support for charter schools. 


A statehouse panel is considering changes that could decrease funding for charter schools. Jeremy Chiappetta from Blackstone Valley Prep Mayoral Academy said families should have choices when it comes to public school.

“We are looking to continue to grow a high quality public school sector that includes charter schools, state run schools, independent schools and certainly traditional public schools,.” Chiappetta said.


Channel 12 reports the Providence Board of Licenses believes there’s not enough concrete evidence to revoke a liquor license for a bar that’s been implicated in a corruption probe. But Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza said he’s still looking into the matter.

Yet more snow is on the way for Rhode Island.  The national weather service expects about one to three inches of snow starting late Tuesday afternoon.  

The snow is predicted to switch over to a wintry mix by midnight, lasting into Wednesday morning. Meteorologist Benjamin Sipprell said this could affect the Wednesday morning commute.

“As we go into Wednesday morning, temperatures will be pretty well above normal, so the expectation is for the morning commute, it may be a little soupy out there with very low visibility along area roadways,” said Sipprell.

John Bender / RIPR

In what has become an all too familiar winter announcement this year, the cities of Providence and Newport have ordered street parking  bans.

Mayor Jorge Elorza announced this afternoon that the capital city’s parking ban will go into effect at midnight Monday (March 2) and remain in effect until further notice. The mayor also said in a statement that parents should remain on alert for a possible school tomorrow. The city’s snow hotline telephone number is 680-8080.

Providence NAACP branch President Jim Vincent talks with Rhode Island Public Radio's Elisabeth Harrison, and WPRI investigative reporter Tim White, about community-race relations in the state, as the media has turned its focus from the demonstrations this summer.  Vincent also weighs in on the lack of diversity in state government, and asks what National Black History month really achieves.

Hear more of our conversation with Jim Vincent in our Political Roundtable

John Bender / RIPR

This February is officially the snowiest on record in Providence, according to the National Weather Service.  A light snowfall on Tuesday night pushed the monthly total to 31.6 inches, breaking the city record set in 1962. 

Meteorologist Alan Dunham says that’s even more than the famed February blizzard of '78. “1978 is in third place with a total of 28.6 inches, for the month of February," said Dunham.

And forecasters predict the new record could get just a bit higher before the month is out.  An inch or less of snow could fall this afternoon. 

John Bender / RIPR

World renowned composer and performer Philip Glass is in Rhode Island.  He performed at Veterans Memorial Auditorium in Providence Wednesday as part of a program put on by local arts non-profit First Works. He continues his visit Thursday, to work with students at the Jacqueline Walsh School for the performing arts in Pawtucket.  For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender examines the draw of Philip Glass’ music, and why it endures.


New details are emerging about a major arts festival scheduled in Providence this summer. The event is part of Mayor Jorge Elorza’s plan to develop the city into an artistic tourist destination. 




An economist who has studied the impact of sports stadiums says Rhode Island should be wary of committing taxpayer dollars to pay for construction on a new facility for the PawSox. 

Elisabeth Harrison

The second Providence elementary school operated by charter school network Achievement First will share a building with its first elementary school, which opened in 2013.

The building on Hartford Avenue was formerly home to a public middle school, but the city shut down the school, citing the cost of rehabilitating an aging facility.

Achievement First says it plans to eventually re-located the new school, "Iluminar Academy," but the co-location is likely to last about two years. The two schools will offer similar programs.

A union that represents the majority of workers recently laid off at Women and Infants Hospital is challenging the job cuts in federal court.

They get to stay on the job until at least Thursday. That’s when a federal judge will hear the union’s challenge. Women and Infants announced the lay-offs this week for more than 40 employees, including certified nurses assistants, imaging technicians, food and laundry service workers.

James Baumgartener / RIPR

Fans of more esoteric pop music, and perhaps of a certain age, may be familiar with the 60's psychedelic rock band Autosalvage.  Former guitarist Rick Turner is a small piece of rock history, and an alumnus of Moses Brown School in Providence.  In addition he's a master guitar maker.

Turner has returned to his alma mater, to teach a course in ukulele making.  Rhode Island Public Radio's weekend host, Chuck Hinman sat down with Turner to talk about his music, life after the band, and returning to teach at his old school.





John Bender / RIPR

The snow is no longer falling, but transportation remains snarled across much of Southern New England.  Public transit has all but shut down in Boston, leaving commuters and others stranded in Providence.

The Massachusetts Bay Transit Authority halted all commuter train and Subway service at 7 p.m. Tuesday. That left riders in Rhode Island with few good options except Amtrak trains, and even those are running on a limited schedule.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week, Dave and Mark talk with Scott DePasquale, Chairman and CEO of Providence-based global software company Utilidata. The company is partnering with Siemens to put voltage regulation software made by Utilidata into power grids. They discuss how more efficient power grids mean smaller power bills and the upside to having a global company in Rhode Island.

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