rain

John Bender / RIPR

One week since the fierce storms that ripped through the state, Rhode Island is in for some more wet weather. Storms are expected to begin Tuesday morning. National Weather Service meteorologist Alan Dunham said there will be a brief reprieve in the late morning.

“We’ll get a bit of a break as a warm front comes through, but then late during the afternoon into the evening we’ll have another round of showers and thunderstorms as a cold front moves over the region,” said Dunham.

A flash flood warning is in effect until Tuesday night for a large swath of Rhode Island. Flooding has already caused trouble in some low-lying areas.

According to the National Weather Service, the greater-Providence area saw three-point-two inches of rain over the weekend, leaving some Cranston roadways underwater. The flooding, mainly in urban areas, included Oaklawn Avenue, where two cars were trapped. Cranston officials say they will deploy public works crews to clean out drains, and monitor the Pawtuxet and Pocasset rivers, which routinely flood.

Thanksgiving travelers are in for a messy drive Wednesday.  A winter storm advisory has been issued for the state, as a storm moving up from the south is expected to dump snow and rain on the Ocean State.  National Weather service meteorologist Alan Dunham said if you can hit the road today, you’ll be better off. The entire state will see rain and snow, about 1-2 inches, but the northern region will see even more.

West River runs high through 1290AM
Aaron Read

As many of you know, RIPR owns and maintains the 1290AM site on the Providence/North Providence town line.  Our NPR satellite downlink is there, and we lease the frequency to our friends at Latino Public Radio.

In the past, the site was largely a pond (Whipple Pond) with Douglas Ave forming part of a dam in the eastern corner.   After the torrential rains of 2010, the dam broke and the pond drained.  Now the West River flows freely through the site.

WCVY no ceiling tiles
Aaron Read

When you’re a broadcast engineer, you get used to receiving calls at odd hours proclaiming things that tend to fall outside the bounds of “normal.”   It’s just the nature of the job.   But even your intrepid engineer can be surprised sometimes.  Friday morning, August 23rd, was one of those times. 

That morning I got a call informing me that WCVY, our 91.5FM signal for much of Kent County, was off the air.

Why was it off the air?

The roof collapsed and rain got in.  

Say what?
 

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