In advance of Earth Day, the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation, the agency that runs the Central Landfill, has launched it's annual education campaign focused on recycling. The campaign includes TV and radio spots and a series of web videos on how to recycle properly. 

Sarah Kite, director of recycling services, said workers at the recycling facility continuously find items that don’t belong in there.

Flo Jonic

  Lawmakers have put the breaks on legislation that could put trash incineration on the table at the Central Landfill. A committee voted to hold the bill for further study. The bill would remove language in a law that bans the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation from including incineration in its statewide trash management plan. It would also remove any references to the high costs of incineration. This is the latest attempt to remove a ban on trash incineration.

Some residents in East Providence thought they won a victory back in 2012, when the Department of Environmental Management shut down a recycling center called TLA Pond View. But now a different company that operates at that site is also facing complaints.

The state fire marshal ordered Railside Environmental Services, LLC to stop bringing new recyclables into its East Providence facility. Deputy fire marshal Richard James said the company, also known as RES Recycling, has to truck out existing materials due to the large piles of debris.


Inspectors didn’t identify what chemical prompted an evacuation at the recycling facility of the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation. Earlier this week, the agency shut down its recycling facility, after workers reported smoke coming from the sorting line.

Gary Maddocks, chief of security at the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation, reported thirteen workers taken to the hospital for chemical exposures are all well. He said workers do their best to sort and remove anything that doesn’t belong in the recycling facility to prevent such incidents.

Providence Mayor Angel Taveras has announced some staff changes in his office, including the hiring of Brian Hull as director of municipal and intergovernmental affairs.

Taveras, a candidate for the Democratic nomination for governor, said in a news release that Hull will begin work April 28th.  The job is basically a government relations post that includes representing the administration before the Providence City Council.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Residents in the city of Providence are recycling more than they were nearly a year ago.

The city delivered small gray trash barrels in the fall of 2012, so that residents could use their green 95-gallon trash bins as recycling bins instead.

The city sent out mailings, recorded phone messages, and launched an advertising campaign to let people know of the switch. But that wasn’t enough.

Kessner Photography via Creative Commons

For a pair of Rhode Island businessmen, sending food waste to the landfill doesn’t make any sense. So they’re raising money to build a composting plant. It would be the state’s first industrial-scale composting facility.

The Central Landfill is expected to reach full capacity in about 25 years. Leo Pollock and Nat Harris said their composting facility is not going to solve the state’s landfill problem, but it will help. 

Wikimedia Commons

With Christmas over, many families have already started to take down the tree.  State officials are urging people to recycle them.

Most Rhode Island communities provide curbside pick-up of Christmas trees. The trees are hauled to the central landfill in Johnston, where they’re ground up for use as mulch in the spring.

Sarah Kite, director of recycling services at the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation which operates the landfill, said they accept all organic Christmas decorations provided they’re stripped bare.

RI Considers Burning Some Trash

Mar 20, 2013
Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation Front Entrance

The state has a long standing ban on incinerating trash. However a new bill introduced in the senate could allow the Central Landfill to look at incinerating some of the state’s trash.

Junk Finds Home Through Reuse Marketplace

Mar 8, 2013

The Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation has launched Rhode Island’s participation in a regional program—the “Reuse Marketplace.” This online marketplace allows businesses to find homes for extra items in their offices or warehouses that would otherwise be sent to the landfill.

Businesses and organizations from Rhode Island and several other northeastern states can post items they have or need, and anyone can browse these listings. Resource Recovery Recycling Services Director Sarah Kite says the online marketplace will benefit both businesses and the environment.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Jan 30, 2013

Things are better in Providence, but there is still work to be done. Ousted head of RIPTA, Charles Odimgbe gets $130,000 as part of a severance package.  These stories and more on the RIPR Morning News Podcast.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you.

Right now, all the glass you put in your recycling bins ends up being treated like trash. It's due to a bill passed last year at the statehouse. Since its inception, around 13,000 tons of glass has been buried in the landfill. But the Rhode Island State Director of Clean Water Action, Jamie Rhodes, thinks there's a law that could correct this problem. It's called a “bottle bill” and he joins us in studio to tell us just what it is.