Rhode Island Department of Education

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A majority of Rhode Island’s students are learning in facilities considered below par. That’s according to an independent report commissioned by the Rhode Island Department of Education released Wednesday.

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The Rhode Island Department of Education released a report that puts high school graduation rates among students at the national average.

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Under Obama administration guidance gender nonconforming students were allowed to use bathrooms and changing facilities that corresponded to the gender with which they identified. Last week the Trump administration rescinded the protections, leaving the decisions to states. In the days following, Rhode Island lawmakers, educators, and advocates have voiced their opposition to the rollback.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Students in Rhode Island will take shorter standardized tests next year. 

The multi-state governing board that oversees the so-called PARCC tests, voted Wednesday to shorten testing by about 90 minutes. The change comes following criticism from teachers over the lengthy nature of the test.

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State lawmakers say public schools may be paying more than their fair share to support charter schools. That’s the major finding of a legislative report about the school system’s "fair funding formula."

The fair funding formula requires public schools to pay charter schools a certain amount per student that opts to attend a charter school instead. That amount is calculated on how much public schools spend per pupil. But it includes expenses charter schools haven’t had to worry about.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Rhode Island is getting $2.3 million to help expand the state’s public preschool programs.  There are already 17 up and running.

Education leaders are raising concerns over the House Finance Committee’s proposed budget. The budget fully funds the state’s formula for providing education aid, but there’s no funding for school construction.

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Rhode Island Education commissioner Deborah Gist delivers her annual State of Education address Thursday.  Standardized test scores for thousands of RI students come out Friday, and some 4,000 high school seniors will find out whether they did well enough to graduate. This is the first year test scores are linked are required under a new sate policy, and some students are protesting.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

4,000 high school seniors across Rhode Island need to beef-up their math skills so they can improve their test scores enough to graduate under a controversial new high school diploma system. Many of them are spending the summer doing just that. Roughly 100 students participated in a program wrapping up this week at the Community College of Rhode Island. It brought students from Providence, Warwick and Cranston together to study math and get a taste of college life.

“Okay, we’re gonna do five 0r 10 more minutes of class, then we’re gonna take the test.”

A collaborative effort to research and treat autism is rolling out in Rhode Island. This new consortium includes universities, hospitals and state agencies.

The Rhode Island Consortium for Autism Research and Treatment, or RI-CART, brings doctors researchers and educators together to advance autism research and put a spotlight on the disorder. Dozens of organizations are involved, including Bradley Hospital, Brown University and the Rhode Island Department of Education.