rhode island department of health

RIPR FILE PHOTO

State Attorney General Peter Kilmartin is the latest to join a bipartisan investigation into pharmaceutical companies’ marketing tactics of prescription opioids.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A state Senate bill aiming to streamline the merger and acquisition process for nonprofit hospitals is scheduled for a vote in the Health and Human Services Committee Tuesday. The bill, which would amend the Hospital Conversions Act, has sparked debate between lawmakers and hospital union workers.

Dawn / flickr

A new heat advisory policy for the northeast will take effect this summer thanks to a study published today that looks at the relationship between heat and health in New England.

Creative Commons License / Pixabay

The Ocean State is being honored by March of Dimes Monday for its work in reducing premature births. Preterm births have dropped by 10 percent between 2010 and 2015 — down to 8.6 percent.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island communities are taking expired or unused prescription medication for the fifth year in a row through a partnership between the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, public safety officials, and health advocates.

Updated opioid prescription regulations are in effect now as part of a statewide effort to cut overdose deaths by one- third over the next three years.

Alachua County / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE VIA FLICKR

Forum: Seizing the Moment to End HepC

Oct 31, 2016
FORUM Seizing the Moment to End HepC
Aaron Read

Seizing the Moment to End Hepatitis C:
A Discussion with Experts and Advocates

WATCH THE ARCHIVED VIDEO WEBCAST HERE

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A shellfishing ban in Narragansett Bay has been lifted ahead of schedule. All conditional areas were closed over the weekend and will reopen today at noon. 

The ban was put in place more than a week ago when the water tested positive for a toxic algae. The bay and its tributaries were closed to shellfishing while the state tested the water and shellfish for the toxin domoic acid. Since then samples collected from the area have tested negative.

The state departments of health and environmental management will continue to collect and analyze samples twice a week. 

Aaron Read / RIPR

There’s new federal funding to help Rhode Island fight the opioid addiction and overdose epidemic. The money is going toward better data collection, first responders and an overdose hotline.

Christopher Irwin / Creative Commons License via Flickr

For a year and a half, tens of thousands of people in Flint, Michigan were exposed to drinking water with dangerously high levels of lead. In the wake of the crisis, water sampling methods have come under scrutiny. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza sat down with the chief of the center for drinking water quality at the Rhode Island Department of Health to learn how Rhode Island has changed its testing protocols post-Flint.

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island

Aug 9, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here's what's happening in health in Rhode Island.

  • Eliminate Hep C in RI? Brown researchers project more treatment could reduce hepatitis C by 90% in Rhode Island by 2030.

Rhode Island Keeps Tabs on Zika

Aug 5, 2016
Cynthia Goldsmith / CDC

The Rhode Island Health Department has confirmed 18 cases of Zika virus -- a disease linked to a severe birth defect called microcephaly. 

The National Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report all of the Rhode Island cases were contracted outside of state lines. 

The mosquito known to carry Zika in Florida is not established in Rhode Island. However, the state may be at risk for another mosquito which also carries the virus. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Cumberland, Rhode Island popped up on a list of cities and towns that have unsafe levels of the chemical perfluorooctanoic acid, or PFOA. It’s used to make Teflon. It turns out those levels have dropped significantly in the town over the past year.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

New research from the Pew Charitable Trusts shows Rhode Island is leading the nation when it comes to reducing painkiller prescriptions. State officials attribute the drop to education for doctors and patients about the risk of opioid overdose.

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