rhode island kids count

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Five years ago, 11 out of every 1,000 children in the state had at least one parent in jail. Today that number is closer to 13, according to a new report from the nonprofit advocacy group Rhode Island Kids Count.

RHODE ISLAND KIDS COUNT

Rhode Island Kids Count

The most comprehensive collection of statistics about the health and well-being of Rhode Island’s children comes out today from Rhode Island Kids Count. Overall,kids have made some promising gains in health and education, but the agency says progress is still needed on several fronts.

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island, Feb. 14

Feb 14, 2017
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Feb. 14

VALENTINE’S DAY: Happy Valentine’s Day! Don’t forget to be good to your heart. Stop smoking. Exercise. Eat healthy food. And surround yourself with people you love and who love you.

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island, Jan. 17

Jan 17, 2017
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s happening in health care in Rhode Island, Jan. 17th:

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island, Dec. 6

Dec 6, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Dec. 6:

THUNDERMIST CEO: Thundermist Health Center President and CEO Chuck Jones is stepping down in February. Jones joined Thundermist in 2008. He moves on to be CEO of Harbor Health Services in Dorchester, MA. Thundermist will conduct a nationwide search for his replacement.

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island, Oct. 18

Oct 18, 2016
Public Doman

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island:

Your Weekly Briefing: Health In Rhode Island, 9/20

Sep 20, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here's what's happening in health care in Rhode Island:

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RIPR FILE


RIPR FILE

Just two decades ago, the vast majority of Rhode Island children had elevated levels of lead in their blood when they were tested at the start of Kindergarten. Today, the percentage has dropped into the single digits, according to Rhode Island Kids Count Executive Director Elizabeth Burke Bryant, whose organization started tracking blood lead statistics in the mid-1990s.

RIPR FILE

Children are becoming more diverse in Rhode Island, but the number of babies born in withdrawal from opioids continues to grow. Those are just some of the statistics in this year’s Kids Count fact book, which comes out Monday. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison spoke with Rhode Island Kids Count Executive Director Elizabeth Burke Bryant about several of the highlights in the report.  

Rhode Island is 7th in the nation for children’s healthcare coverage. That’s according to 2014 numbers from the U.S. Census.  It’s a big jump from last year, when Rhode Island was 16th.

Today, nearly 97 percent of Rhode Island children have health insurance, up from about 94 percent in 2013. Elizabeth Burke-Bryant of the advocacy non-profit Rhode Island Kid’s Count said the leap can be partly attributed to a major PR push to get people insured, under Obamacare.

Aaron Read / RIPR

A coalition of researchers from Rhode Island’s colleges and universities have released another round of reports on the state’s economy. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what will happen to the latest round of research.

If Rhode Island were a bench, it would splinter under the weight of all the blue-ribbon commissions and consultant-generated reports that have for decades weighed in on what ails our state’s economy.

Young children in Rhode Island are more ethnically diverse than ever before. That according to new data from Rhode Island Kids Count.

Fewer than three out of every five Rhode Island kids under age five now identify as white. That’s a huge drop from their grandparents’ generation. 91 percent of state residents who are 65 and older identify as white. Kids Count released the numbers as part of a new report on infants, toddlers and their families.

The number of babies born with exposure to opioid drugs and alcohol nearly doubled in Rhode Island between 2006 and 2013. 

That’s one of the more startling facts in the new Rhode Island Kids Count Factbook. Executive Director Elizabeth Burke-Bryant said unlike earlier drug problems, this one is not concentrated in urban areas.

“90 percent of babies born with drugs in their system, were born to white mothers and 32 percent lived in the four core cities, which means the majority of these cases are spread to the rest of Rhode Island,” said Bryant.

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