Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation

Lisa

In advance of Earth Day, the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation, the agency that runs the Central Landfill, has launched it's annual education campaign focused on recycling. The campaign includes TV and radio spots and a series of web videos on how to recycle properly. 

Sarah Kite, director of recycling services, said workers at the recycling facility continuously find items that don’t belong in there.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Nosotros tiramos un montón de comida durante los días festivos. Más de lo habitual. La comida que termina en la basura no sólo perjudica nuestros bolsillos, pero también llena los vertederos, o rellenos sanitarios, despidiendo gases nocivos.

El Consejo de Políticas Alimentarias de Rhode Island (en ingles: Rhode Island Food Policy Council) lanzó un programa piloto a principios de este año, enseñando a la gente a reducir la cantidad de comida que tiran. Nuestra reportera ambiental Ambar Espinoza ensayo con el programa y tiene esta historia.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

We throw away a lot of food over the holidays. More than usual. We generate about 25 percent more waste between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. Food that ends up in the trash can not only hurts our wallets, but also fills up landfills, sending off noxious gases. The Rhode Island Food Policy Council launched a pilot program earlier this year, teaching people how to cut down the amount of food they throw away. Our environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza gave it a try and has this story.

RIPR FILE

Inspectors didn’t identify what chemical prompted an evacuation at the recycling facility of the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation. Earlier this week, the agency shut down its recycling facility, after workers reported smoke coming from the sorting line.

Gary Maddocks, chief of security at the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation, reported thirteen workers taken to the hospital for chemical exposures are all well. He said workers do their best to sort and remove anything that doesn’t belong in the recycling facility to prevent such incidents.

With the shrinking capacity of the Central Landfill, the executive director of the Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corporation wants recycling and composting food waste to become a priority, not just for the agency, but for the state.

Executive director Michael O’Connell said there’s no time to waste. The landfill’s gates will close in about 25 years at the current rate we’re sending trash to it. He wants people to feel a sense of urgency about the group effort it’s going to take to increase recycling and composting food waste.

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