Rhode Island

Alex Braunstein / RIPR

The City of Providence has a new work of public art. Installations have popped up in public spaces across the city over the past year. The latest is a large mural called “BattleCat,” painted by an Austrian artist who goes by the name NYCHOS.

It’s a part of a series of paintings created by international artists visiting the city through a residency program.

thisisbossi/flickr Creative Commons License

The lawsuit, over the use of a hazardous gasoline additive, names defendants including British Petroleum and Exxon Mobile.

NOAA

The storm, Hermine, which made landfall last week has been downgraded from a category one hurricane, to a tropical storm, to what's called a post-tropical cyclone. In general terms that just means a lower-strength event, said Rebecca Gould, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

"Really no different than a Nor’easter," said Gould. "You might get some showers, some rain, probably not until [Monday night] into [Tuesday]. Winds along the south coast will be a bit stronger than anywhere else. We’re expecting gusts up to about 30-35 mph. In Providence 25-30 mph gusts."

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Fishermen and industry advocates say there’s a real hunger among people to learn more about how fishermen do what they do. That’s why they’re planning to install interpretive signs around the fishing docks at Point Judith to answer people’s questions. 

Erika Smith / Creative Commons License

The first development project on the vacant I-195 land in Providence is complete. The land has sat empty since it became available for development.

Now on one corner of the land near downtown, sits Johnson and Wales University’s new 71,000 thousand square foot science building. The $40 million, three-story building houses a combination of classroom and laboratory space.

On hand for a ribbon cutting ceremony, Governor Gina Raimondo says she hopes the area will eventually be a hub for science and technology.

RIPR FILE

The head of the U.S. department of Housing and Urban Development, Julian Castro, makes a stop in the Ocean State today. Castro is working to raise awareness of efforts to prevent lead poisoning.

Castro will join Senator Jack Reed on a tour of several homes in Providence, where federal funds have been used to clean up lead paint. The pair will also meet with housing officials and environmental advocates to discuss efforts to reduce lead exposure, especially among children.

RIPR FILE

Robert Kando, the executive director of the state’s Board of Elections, is out. In a four-to-two vote the group chose to terminate the embattled head.Kando has a bumpy track record at the state Board of Elections. In 2013, he unveiled legislation on behalf of the board without informing board members.

More recently, Kando has been repeatedly suspended as the board’s executive director. One of the suspensions came after Kando did not take management classes ordered as part of an earlier suspension.

RI DOT

  A  community meeting is set for Tuesday  on the future of the 6-10 Connector in Providence. Debate has sprung up over how best to replace the aging infrastructure.

Currently the 6-10 connector is a high-traffic series of roadways, which cut through several Providence neighborhoods. The State Department of Transportation has already offered an initial design proposal, but transportation advocates say it won’t serve the needs of residents, pedestrians and cyclists.

Seth Zeren of the group Fix the 6-10, says the DOT needs to open the project up to more public input.

Repairs are underway for the Tall Ship Providence. The historic ship was destroyed last year after toppling over in windy conditions in the Newport shipyard.

A shipment of Douglas fir tree limbs arrived in Rhode Island from Washington State last week to rebuild the vessel. Captain Thorpe Leeson said work has begun rebuilding the masts and booms out of the massive limbs.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Vermont officials announced new measures Thursday to expand the availability of a drug that can counteract the effects of an opiate overdose. The drug can now be sold by any Vermont pharmacy without a prescription.

The drug is naloxone, which is often sold under the brand name Narcan, and it's already saving lives in Vermont. Health Commissioner Harry Chen said his department is distributing more and more doses.

“The health department now gives out about 700 doses per month throughout 12 distribution sites,” said Chen.

PETER GOLDBERG / Gamm Theatre

Across Rhode Island, local theaters are gearing up for their fall season. Rhode Island Public Radio’s Chuck Hinman traveled to the Contemporary Theater Company in Wakefield to talk with Terry Shea, an actor and director who also covers theater for Motif Magazine. Shea has a line on what to expect from the great variety of local theater that Rhode Island has to offer, from the well-established to the up and coming.

albertogp123 / flickr/creative commons license

Rhode Island students scored a little bit better this spring on the annual standardized test known as PARCC, or the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers.

In the second year of the test, scores improved by an average of 5 percentage points in math and 2 percentage points in English.  But State Education Commissioner Ken Wagner said gaps between urban and suburban students showed little or no change, and in some cases worsened.

Aaron Read / RIPR


Roger Williams Park Zoo

The baby’s name is Polly and she’s a Matschie’s Tree Kangaroo, an endangered species, with only a few dozen in captivity in the United States.

The kangaroos have a reddish-brown and white coat with small ears and long tails. They’re found in the rainforests of Papau New Guinea, where they spend most of their time climbing trees in high-altitude forests. However, the species is threatened by logging, mining, and drilling. Six Matschie’s Tree Kangaroos were born in captivity in the United States last year as part of the Association of Zoos and Aquarium’s Species Survival Program.

Providence Police have identified 30-year-old Michelle Cagnon of Cumberland as the woman struck and killed by a bus in downtown Providence Wednesday morning. Cagnon was crossing the street at approximately 8:15 a.m. near Kennedy Plaza when she was hit by a Peter Pan bus.

A park ranger for the city witnessed the collision and called authorities to the scene, where Cagnon was later pronounced dead. 

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