Rhode Island

John Bender / RIPR

As we enter the dog days of summer, even night air offers little respite for from the stifling heat. In Providence, many of the city’s children rely on public pools to stay cool. Last year the Davey Lopes Pool in South Providence reopened following a controversial closure.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender revisits the pool a year later, which many call an anchor of the community.

RIPR File

The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded Rhode Island five grants totaling more than a million dollars to clean up contaminated properties across the state.

The money will help with the cleanup of contaminated sites in the cities of Central Falls, Pawtucket, and Providence.

Megan Sepe

Ocean crews will sail through the night for the 11th annual Ida Lewis Distance Race. The race leaves Newport Friday.

Roughly 40 boats are expected to set sail from Fort Adams in Newport. Their course will depend on wind speeds and will take about 24-hours to complete.  Organizer Skip Helme said if the winds are strong enough, the boats may travel as far as Montauk Long Island.

One of the people putting together a new economic strategy for Rhode Island says the plan will include specific, actionable recommendations. The study is expected to be completed by December or January.

The Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program is collaborating with the state to devise a strategy for growing jobs. Private funding is paying for the effort. Brookings’ Senior Fellow Mark Muro said the economic strategy will include both long-term and short-term components.

John Bender / RIPR

As residents continue to deal with the aftermath of last week’s destructive storms, lawmakers are hoping to help those most affected.

RIPR FILE

The Cranston City Council may ask the General Assembly to overhaul the disciplinary process used for vetting complaints against police officers. Yet those changes are considered unlikely due to opposition from police unions.

Katrin Baustmann

A new report from Providence Water finds some homes served by the water authority may be exposed to elevated levels of lead.  

The utility provides water to customers in Providence, North Providence, Johnston, and Cranston. Providence Water says the culprit is old lead pipes. About one in five Providence Water customers have lead pipes.

In a statement Providence Water writes: 

Researchers spotted 17 Great White Sharks during a single research trip last week.  That’s about double the number spotted by researchers at the same time last year.

John Bender / RIPR

One week since the fierce storms that ripped through the state, Rhode Island is in for some more wet weather. Storms are expected to begin Tuesday morning. National Weather Service meteorologist Alan Dunham said there will be a brief reprieve in the late morning.

“We’ll get a bit of a break as a warm front comes through, but then late during the afternoon into the evening we’ll have another round of showers and thunderstorms as a cold front moves over the region,” said Dunham.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave speak with Kelly Ramirez, the CEO of the Social Enterprise Greenhouse, a local business-incubator, for socially minded businesses. The group just won a national competition for their work with start-ups. Since its inception five years ago, the group has worked with 65 business. SE Greenhouse recently partnered with Brown University.

 

When to listen:

Military's Tallest Ship Arrives In Newport

Aug 7, 2015

The tallest ship in the U.S. military arrives Friday in Newport.  The Coast Guard cutter, “The Eagle,” is 295 feet in length and uses more than 6 miles of rigging. For over 60 years, the sailing vessel has served as a classroom for future Coast Guard officers.

Michael Thompson is stationed with the U.S. Coast Guard in Newport. He will be assisting with public tours of the ship this weekend.

John Bender / RIPR

Upper Narragansett Bay is cleaner than it used to be. That’s according to the latest data from the Narragansett Bay Commission.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Rhode Island’s New Education Commissioner Ken Wagner started work this week with a visit to a public school in Providence. He stopped by Rhode Island Public Radio to talk about test scores and the state of Rhode Island Public Schools with Rhode Island Public Radio’s Elisabeth Harrison.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you. news@ripr.org

John Bender

More than two days after thunderstorms brought down trees and power lines in Rhode Island, some 3,000  homes and businesses are still without power, many in the Cranston and Warwick area. Hundreds also remain without power along the southern coast near Westerly and Charlestown, according to National Grid's website.

Kenneth C. Zirkel / Wikimedia Commons

The Providence Athenaeum has appointed a new executive director. Matt Burriesci comes to the non-profit following work with the director of the Association of Writers and Writing Programs and the PEN/Faulkner Foundation. He’s also the author of two books, including one novel.

The Providence Athenaeum is an independent library and cultural center, founded in 1836.

Burresci and his family will move to Providence this month from the Washington D.C. area. He begins his tenure at the library and cultural center on September first.

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