Rhode Island

Matt Sledge / RIPR FILE

Affordable housing advocates are worried President Donald Trump’s promises to reduce corporate taxes could affect their ability to finance new projects. Their concern is the future of the Low Income Housing Tax Credit.

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons License

A Syrian refugee is expected to arrive in Rhode Island in the coming days. This will likely be the last refugee allowed into the state before President Trump issues a new executive order on immigration.

RIPR FILE

Monday marks the 14th anniversary of the Station Nightclub fire, which took the lives 100 people in 2003. 

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A swastika was discovered Thursday morning spray-painted on a dumpster in front of a YMCA in Providence. Staff say they removed the anti-Semitic symbol shortly after its discovery.

In a statement, Greater Providence YMCA CEO Steven O'Donnell called it "an unfortunate, and hopefully isolated, incident."

O'Donnell said the graffiti was reported to Providence Police. 

Rhode Island ranks last in New England for the amount of venture capital investment in local business. The finding is part of a new report on the state of Rhode Island’s small business climate.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark are joined by former Blue Cross-Blue Shield of RI President and CEO James Purcell.

The three discuss the Trump Administration and the future of the Affordable Care Act. The also talk about Trump cabinet pick Tom Price for Secretary of Health and Human Services, and possible changes in Medicaid.

When to listen:

John Bender / RIPR

King’s Tabernacle Church took the town of Johnston to court last year after town officials appeared to be trying to block the congregation from moving into a long-abandoned building in town. The church, whose congregation is small and largely African American, cited racial bias. But today the community is thriving in the heart of one of the most Italian, Catholic areas of the state.

John Bender / RIPR

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza touted new planned investments and the city’s increasingly stable financial footing during his annual State of the City address Wednesday night. Elorza announced that Providence would have its first rainy day fund since 2011 at the end of this fiscal year.

Elorza also recognized the city faces steep financial challenges. The city owes hundreds of millions of dollars in unfunded pension liabilities. 

Ximena Conde / RIPR

This week our series "One Square Mile" is getting to know the town of Johnston. And if you’ve ever taken a drive on Greenville Avenue in Johnston, you’ll notice residential homes across the street from working farms. Johnston used to be home to many dairy farms and orchards that over time have dwindled to roughly a dozen working farms.

John Bender / RIPR


John Bender / RIPR

Dozens of Rhode Islanders flooded the offices of Senators Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse Tuesday to voice anger over President Donald Trump’s cabinet picks and recent executive orders.

The demonstrators plan to keep up the pressure at congressional offices every week during the first 100 days of Trump’s administration.

Some 50 people crammed into a conference room at Senator Jack Reed’s Cranston office. The Senator is in Washington, but the group spoke with an aide and Reed’s local chief of staff, Raymond Simone.

John Bender / RIPR

According to a report from the Rhode Island chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, some legal registered voters in the state were unable to vote. The organization says this highlights flaws in the state’s voter ID laws.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Virtually all Rhode Islanders have at least a loose connection to the town of Johnston. Almost all of your junk -- trash, dried out Christmas trees, even used paint -- winds up at the Johnston Landfill.  Those items are all sorted and processed in different parts of the sprawling complex.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Rhode Island Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea is joining a growing chorus of lawmakers responding to claims by President Donald Trump that millions of people voted illegally.

The Environment Council of Rhode Island has laid out its legislative priorities for the new General Assembly session. The group, comprised mostly of local non-profit environmental groups, hopes to cut carbon emissions with a new tax and increase renewable energy efforts.

The Council proposed a new tax that would be levied on companies bringing carbon-based fuels into the state. A tax rate of $15 per ton of potential carbon emissions would go to fund state renewable energy efforts.

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