Rhode Island

Hundreds of teachers and school leaders are expected in Providence Thursday for the Coalition of Essential Schools Fall Forum. The group was founded by former Brown University Education Chair Ted Sizer, who advocated for giving schools freedom to design their own programs.

Maggie Hall / Wilbury Theatre Group

Providence's Wilbury Theatre Group has never avoided doing the controversial.  Rhode Island Public Radio's Bill Gale says their current play, “Straight White Men” definitely fits into that catalog.

The Conservation Law Foundation is asking the Rhode Island Public Utilities Commission to reconsider its decision not to reject a consumer tax that would help pay for natural gas pipeline expansions in the region. The PUC denied CLF’s request in September.

The project was billed as a regional solution to rising electricity costs. But since then New Hampshire and Connecticut have followed Massachusetts in dropping the project. CLF Attorney Max Greene said the state of Maine has signaled it will consider the project but only if other New England states participate. 

John Bender / RIPR

Dorcas International Institute is one of the state’s largest immigration and refugee organizations. Since the election, many Rhode Islanders have reached out to the institute, a nonprofit that provides education, resettlement assistance and other services for immigrants and refugees.

Executive Director Kathy Cloutier said some people are making donations; others want to know how they can help to make sure immigrants still feel welcome in the state.

New England Readies For Trump’s Refugee Plans

Nov 29, 2016
RI State Council of Churches

Rhode Island resettled more than 300 refugees over the last year, including more than 100 from Syria. An even larger number of refugees are expected to arrive this year. But that could change under President-elect Donald Trump. 

Markham Starr

Connecticut-based photographer Markham Starr has dedicated almost a decade to documenting New England’s fishing industry. His photos, featured in an exhibit at the Fishing Heritage Center in New Bedford, include a type of fishing unique to Rhode Island. 

Narragansett Fishermen Part Of New Photography Exhibit

Nov 28, 2016

The exhibit is now on display at the Fishing Heritage Center in New Bedford. Connecticut-based photographer Markham Starr has dedicated almost a decade to documenting New England’s fishing industry. 

Starr photographed fishermen across New England, and says he took a special interest in the trap fishers of Point Judith in Narragansett.

“It’s an ancient type of fishing,” said Starr. “They’ve been doing it probably 150 years in Rhode Island and other traps like it go back even earlier. But there’s only three practitioners left really because it requires a lot of manpower.”

Peter Goldberg / Gamm Theatre

Playwright David Mamet is well known for works such as “Glengarry Glen Ross” and “Speed-The-Plow.” But many think “American Buffalo” is his masterpiece. Bill Gale says the Gamm Theater's production is proof of that.

“American Buffalo” was first done in Chicago way back in 1975, that time – if you can believe it -  of no cell phones , no Facebook.  And Twitter? That was something birds in the trees did.

Janet Graham / Creative Commons License

The invasive moths are native to Europe and first appeared in New England around 2004. The females lay their eggs between Thanksgiving and the New Year, and their offspring can cause extensive damage to foliage when they hatch as caterpillars in the spring.

Heather Faubert, a research associate at the University of Rhode Island, said so far there’s only one real way to deal with winter months.  

Alex Braunstein / RIPR

What if you could only eat food grown within a few miles of your home for the next ten days? For most of us, that would mean no bread, no coffee, and no olive oil. A group of 57 Aquidneck Island residents decided to take on the challenge, and Rhode Island Public Radio’s Alex Braunstein joined one of them for lunch at her home in Newport.

RI State Archives / Public Domain

An array of photos and documents now on display at the State Archives chronicles the history of indigenous peoples in Rhode Island.  The area was once home to several Native American tribes, including the Wompanoag and the Narragansett.

The exhibit features early deeds between colonists and the tribes living in the area. One of the deeds gave Aquidneck Island to Roger Williams in a deal with the Narragansett Nation.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo is responding to Monday statehouse demonstration, where more than 100 peopled called for state lawmakers to pledge action against some of the President-elect’s campaign promises. The group known as “Resist Hate RI” delivered a letter Raimondo.

In the letter, the progressive group demands that the Governor, Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed, and House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello, protect rights they see as threatened by Donald Trump’s administration. Governor Raimondo responded with a lengthy post on social media.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

There have been anecdotal reports about a rise in hate crimes around the country since the presidential election. But it remains unclear whether there’s been a similar uptick in Rhode Island. That's because the state has no centralized mechanism for reporting suspected hate crimes.

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin's office says the only way to find out would be to survey local police departments.

RIPR FILE

A new report on homeless youth in Rhode Island found at least 172 people between the ages of 18 and 24 using emergency shelters in 2015. The report comes from nonprofit Crossroads, a homeless services provider. Crossroads Director Karen Santilli said it’s difficult to track homeless young people.

“They are couch surfing, they are hanging out with friends, they’re finding places to stay in encampments, that are out, off the shelter system,” said Santilli. “So the fact that 172 came into the shelter system is high, but we know the numbers are higher than that.”

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

If you’re hitting the road this Thanksgiving holiday prepare for some company on the interstate, a lot of it. Nearly 50-million people are expected to travel through the weekend. That’s an uptick of nearly 2 percent in the amount of travelers from last Thanksgiving, according to AAA, and the highest number since 2007. The vast majority will hit the road says AAA Northeast spokesman John Paul

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