Rhode Island

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Next week voters go to the polls to pick the next president of the United States. Rhode Island voters also vote on several statewide issues, including the proposal to build a casino in Tiverton.

As part of our Rhody Votes ’16 coverage Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender headed to Tiverton, where residents are seemed lukewarm about the casino.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

A new railroad investment is about to get underway in eastern Connecticut that its backers hope will be a boost for the economy right along the tracks and into greater New England.

Instead of giant scissors, the New England Central Railroad chose a train to cut the ribbon on this new project.

Pi.1415926535 / Creative Commons License

Rail improvements may be on track for the New England Central Railroad, but another rail project stalled this year in New Hampshire, when lawmakers stopped a plan for commuter rail service into Boston. Now, it seems the November 8th election could change the tide for that commuter rail expansion.

Earlier this year, it seemed a commuter rail line could really happen for Southern New Hampshire.  

Tony Kent/flickr / Creative Commons License

Rhode Island has a storied haunted history, from Mercy Brown, the 19th century "vampire" in Exeter, to H.P. Lovecraft, the author of weird and spooky tales who called Providence home. The new "Guidebook to Haunted and Strange Places in Rhode Island" is out just in time for Halloween,

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

On Smith Hill, the heads of state agencies begin briefings on their budgets so far this year and their future spending projections. 

Nancy Eve Cohen / WFCR

Some Housatonic River advocates say they wish the EPA’s cleanup plan called for digging up more PCBs. PCBs are a man-made toxin, which was manufactured in the 1920s. This comes as the agency released its final plan to remove toxins from the river which runs through western Massachusetts and Connecticut. The $613 million plan calls for removing and capping PCBs from the river bottom and floodplain.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line. Mark is off this week.

This week, Dave speaks with Scott Jensen, director of Rhode Island’s Department of Labor and Training.

The agency has a new program called “Platform to Employment” program, which helps people unemployed long-term find jobs. Dave and Scott discuss how the program works, how people are selected, what kind of training they receive, and what kinds of companies are participating.

David Goehring / Creative Commons License via Flickr

A trio of New England states has selected projects that will add about 460 megawatts of renewable energy to the region’s market in the next few years. Bidding companies can start negotiating with utilities in Rhode Island, Connecticut and Massachusetts.

John Bender / RIPR

Nearly 30,000 Rhode Islanders have applied to vote by mail in the presidential election, up from roughly 23,000 in 2012. Those numbers from the office of Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea. Mail-in ballots are counted on Election Night. Gorbea says local boards of canvassers help to guard against vote fraud.

“The mail ballot comes in and is reviewed by the local boards of canvassers and if there are any kinds of discrepancies that seem to trigger a concern, they’re taken up by the state Board of Elections,” said Gorbea.

Manton Avenue Project

Live theater is thriving in Rhode Island, and one program may inspire a new generation of playwrights. The Manton Avenue Project has kids write the plays and adult actors bring them to life. Rhode Island Public Radio intern Tarpley Hitt went to a performance to check it out.  

On a Saturday evening, kids race around a small stage in Roger Williams Memorial Park, fighting for the best patch of grass. Parents lean back on beach chairs as two performers enter with microphones.

RIPR file photo

Attorneys General from across the eastern United States convene Thursday in Newport. They’re participating in a two-day conference organized by the National Association of Attorneys General.

Amy Kempe from the Rhode Island Attorney General’s office says the meeting will focus on making the most of taxpayer money through partnerships.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea hosted a roundtable Thursday to address questions about cyber security and voter fraud.

Yale Publishes Mysterious Medieval Manuscript

Oct 27, 2016
Davis Dunavin / WSHU

It’s one of the world’s great literary mysteries: a 15th century book full of bizarre illustrations of imaginary plants, astrological signs, surreal figures and landscapes. Its origins are unknown, its creator anonymous. And it’s written entirely in an unknown language that’s stumped the world’s greatest code breakers.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won Rhode Island's Democratic primary by more than 10 points, beating rival Hillary Clinton with the help of grass-roots and student-led efforts. But Sanders went on to lose the nomination, leaving his most ardent fans in something of a quandary.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The rare New England cottontail rabbit and other shrubland species are getting some new help from the U.S. Fish and wildlife Service. The agency is targeting 15,000 acres of land in six northeastern states, to be included in a new "Great Thickets National Wildlife Refuge."

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