RI ACLU

Chris Potter

A hearing has been continued, in the Providence Journal's lawsuit against a judge, following a high-profile murder trial. Karen Bordeleau, president of the New England First Amendment Coalition and a former executive editor of The Providence Journal, discusses the lawsuit. Bordeleau said an order from Superior Court Judge Netti Vogel barring access to the jury was not normal procedure for the court.   

The fallout from two significant events will remain in the air when Rhode Island lawmakers return from their mid-winter break next week. With that in mind, thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

A sadly familiar story dominates the news once again.  Meanwhile, the political beat remains busy in the Biggest Little. As usual your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Blink a few times and fall will be here before we know it -- right? -- so enjoy summer while you can. Meanwhile, thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A lawsuit filed by the Rhode Island chapter of the ACLU charges that the Pawtucket Police Department is violating the state's open records law by choosing not to release internal affairs reports on officer-initiated complaints.

Providence Police Department

 

Steve Brown, executive director of Rhode Island's American Civil Liberties Union, joins Bonus Q&A this week. He discussed a range of topics, including racial profiling, reproductive rights & more.  

Elisabeth Harrison

The Rhode Island Senate is considering legislation that would eliminate life sentences without possibility of parole for minors.

"Long sentences on a person that’s under 18 constitutes, in our view, and in the view of the Supreme Court and many other ACLU affiliates, as unusual punishment and violates basic human rights standards," said Marcela Betancur, a spokeswoman for the Rhode Island American Civil Liberties Union.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The Rhode Island Superior Court is slated to hear a case involving alleged discrimination against a prospective employee who used medical marijuana. The Rhode Island ACLU is claiming the employer tried to shut out a worker with a disability.

Wikimedia Commons

Under Obama administration guidance gender nonconforming students were allowed to use bathrooms and changing facilities that corresponded to the gender with which they identified. Last week the Trump administration rescinded the protections, leaving the decisions to states. In the days following, Rhode Island lawmakers, educators, and advocates have voiced their opposition to the rollback.

RI ACLU Files FOIA Over Travel Ban Implementation

Feb 2, 2017
RI ACLU

The Rhode Island ACLU is demanding details from U.S. Customs and Border officials on how they are handling President Donald Trump’s travel ban. The move is a coordinated freedom of information request with multiple states.

RIPR FILE

  Senior U.S. District Court Judge Ronald Lagueux ruled today that the city of Cranston violated the one person one vote Baker V. Carr standards when the city allocated the entire population of the Adult Correctional Institutions as `residents’ of one city ward when it drew district borders for the city council and school committee.

The ruling concluded that Cranston artificially inflated the population of Ward 6 by treating all inmates of the ACI as residents of the prison for redistricting purposes.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

A Providence lawmaker has withdrawn a bill that would have provided explicit protections for transgender people to use public bathrooms. State Representative Edith Ajello said the state’s current law prohibiting discrimination on the basis of gender identity provides enough protection for transgender people. 

Ajello said she came to the conclusion after speaking with local LGBT advocates, and seeing the letter from the Obama Administration directing schools to allow students to use bathrooms corresponding to their gender identity.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Transgender advocates and civil rights groups plan to urge Rhode Island to adopt a statewide policy on transgender students in public schools. Last week the federal government issued guidance that says transgender students must be allowed to use the bathroom and locker room of the gender they identify with.

The Obama administration also instructed teachers to use the name and pronoun the family prefers.

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