RI economic development

The death of Rhode Island labor leader Frank Montanaro Sr. reminded former Gov. Lincoln Almond of Montanaro’s crucial role in helping to get the Fidelity Investments building in Smithfield done in the 1990s without a labor-management dust-up that could have killed the project.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

A group of more than 20 Rhode Island religious and community groups are calling on the General Assembly to return to the Statehouse to approve a state budget for the fiscal year than began July 1 and approve legislation to limit access to guns for domestic  abusers, grant earned sick time to workers and adopt other measures.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Gov. Gina Raimondo has harped on creating new manufacturing jobs in Rhode Island since she began running for the governorship in 2014. But since moving into the 2nd floor Statehouse office on Smith Hill, the first-term Democrat changed her tune a bit, especially when it comes to recruiting high-tech companies to come to the Ocean State.

This morning, Raimondo’s face was peering out from the first business page of the Boston Globe. Her message was a distinctly different approach from her emphasis on manufacturing for the Ocean State business crowd.

Gov. Gina Raimondo’s recent roll out of more than $4 million in job training grants to a bevy of Rhode Island agencies likely includes some money that may end up training Connecticut workers, RIPR has learned.

RIPR FILE

So Twin River’s parent company wants to build a new casino in Tiverton.   The idea is likely to raise a few eyebrows, but RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says it  has to be done.

There are many Rhode Islanders who don’t believe that state government should be in the business of promoting gambling. Those critics point out the lottery games and slot-machine emporiums that speckle New England like daffodils these days are little more than cheap taxes on the poor.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Rhode Island’s foundering economic is again the top Statehouse topic. Political analyst Scott MacKay has some thoughts as we at Rhode Island Public Radio kickoff our series on our state’s slow recession recovery. 

If Rhode Island was a lake, we’d all be drowning under the weight of decades of reports and high falutin  expert commissions charged with dissecting our state’s economic doldrums. Wonks, business leaders, academics and consultants have produced turgid chronicles – with scant results – on how to heal the sickest economy in New England.

It looks like the RhodeMap RI debate is much ado about not so much. Those who oppose this largely benign economic and social blueprint have blown the results so far out of proportion as to be ludicrous.