RI jobs

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Rhode Island has yet another study on what ails our state’s economy, this time from the Brookings Institution, a Washington, D.C. think-tank. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what it will take to translate this plan into action.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Gov. Gina Raimondo has harped on creating new manufacturing jobs in Rhode Island since she began running for the governorship in 2014. But since moving into the 2nd floor Statehouse office on Smith Hill, the first-term Democrat changed her tune a bit, especially when it comes to recruiting high-tech companies to come to the Ocean State.

This morning, Raimondo’s face was peering out from the first business page of the Boston Globe. Her message was a distinctly different approach from her emphasis on manufacturing for the Ocean State business crowd.

Aaron Read / RIPR

  It’s the usual mixed bag of good news and not-so-good news as Rhode Island’s unemployment rate dipped one-tenth of a percentage point to 5.2 percent in November, down from 5.3 percent in October, according to data released by the state Department of Labor and Training.

Job gains came in several sectors, including restaurants and hotels, professional and business services,  arts, entertainment and recreation and educational services. But job losses still dog other sectors, including construction, government employment and information.

The state is distributing some $4.5 million dollars for job training programs around the state. The money will be split among 26 groups.

The winning groups include Rhode Island businesses and non-profits across sectors from finance to defense. North Kingstown-based submarine builder Electric Boat received the largest grant of almost $370,000.

Electric Boat training manager Craig Sipe said the company will use the grant to expand training programs.

Aaron Read / RIPR

The latest Rhode Island job numbers are the usual mix of good and not-so-good.

While the rest of the country experienced strong job growth in October, Rhode Island did not. Total jobs were down 600 from the September number of 528,100. The long-beleaguered construction sector is finally picking up, adding 500 jobs in October, the largest gain in construction since April, 2006, when 700 jobs were added.

That was tamped down by declines in food services, government employment and manufacturing.

Aaron Read / RIPR

Rhode Island’s unemployment rate has inched down to 8.7 percent in March, an improvement, but evidence that the state trails the region and most of the nation in economic activity.

The state Department of Labor and Training reports that new data shows the seasonally adjusted rate declined from 9 percent in February and is now at the lowest rate since September, 2008.

The number of Rhode Islanders who were working increased to 506,000 in March, a hike of 2,700 from February  statistics.

Some news for Rhode Island’s beleaguered economy: First quarter tax data shows that job growth in the Ocean State was better than estimated, with the state economy generating 1,700 more jobs that first indicted in the March, 2013 report from the state Dep0artment of Labor and Training.

The DLT says that the new data is based on employment information from the state’s 32,000 private sector employers. The new estimates suggest an over the year gain of 2,300 Rhode Island-based jobs.