RI Republicans

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The 2018 Rhode Island political campaign season kicked off last week with announcements on the Republican side of the campaign for governor and more.  RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay has some thoughts.


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The debate over taxpayer subsidies for a new stadium for the Pawtucket Red Sox rages on. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says that for those who want to keep the team, now is the time to stand up.  


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Sometimes it’s hard to figure who’s in charge at the Rhode Island Statehouse. This year isn’t one of those times, as RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay explains.

In case you were wondering who’s running things on Smith Hill these days, we bring you House Speaker Nick Mattiello, a Cranston Democrat who has ushered in a $9.2 billion state budget that includes his pet project, cutting Rhode Island’s  disdained car tax.

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Former Gov. and U.S. Senator Lincoln Chafee is back on the scene with a series of media appearances. Chafee is thinking about running for governor again, but RIPR Political Analyst Scott MacKay wonders why. 

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Across Rhode Island, college graduates are headed to the wider world. But many of them will spend years paying down the student loans that financed their degrees. RIPR Political Analyst Scott MacKay says it’s time to give students a break, and bring down the cost of higher education.   

Courtesy of Whitehouse office.

Rhode Island’s 2018 U.S. Senate featuring incumbent Democrat Sheldon Whitehouse just got more complicated. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay parses the latest developments. 

While all the chatter in Democratic Party circles is on boycotting and protesting Donald Trump’s inauguration, Rhode Island Republicans are planning a celebration of their candidate’s ascension to the White House. The Rhode Island Republican Party is hosting an Inauguration Watch Party at GOP state headquarters at 1800 Post Road in Warwick, in Airport Plaza. There will be a potluck buffet and beverages. The headquarters is outfitted with a bevy of large screen television sets to watch the changing of the guard in Washington, D.C.

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Last week, a Democratic-fueled effort to get electoral college delegates to switch their votes failed to gain traction or block the election of Republican Donald Trump, who won a majority in the Electoral College but lost the popular vote.

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Rhode Island is likely to lose one of its two U.S. House seats after the 2020 U.S. Census, according to projections by reapportionment guru Kimball W. Brace, who has for many years helped Rhode Island lawmakers draw both state legislative and congressional districts.

This comes as scant surprise to Rhode Island political insiders and the local gang of 500 that follows such news. House seats are based on population, while each state gets two senators, regardless of how many people live in a state.

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An earthquake election left Republicans in control of Congress and the White House. How will Democrats respond? RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay posed the question to Sen. Jack Reed, the senior Rhode Island member of Congress.

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After a toxic presidential campaign, the national question will become how to unite a fractured country. Rhode Island Public Radio political analyst Scott MacKay says Rhode Islanders will hopefully be better at this than other states. 

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Rhode Island voters support all five spending bond issues on the November general election ballot but do not think the state is headed in the right direction, according to results of a public opinion survey conducted by the Hassenfeld  Institute for Public Leadership at Bryant University.

The poll, done by Fleming and Associates, sampled 400 state voters by telephone between October 6th and 10th. It carries an error margin of about 5 percent and included 52 percent landlines and 48 percent mobile phones.

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Politicians love to say that elections matter. Except when some of them don’t like the results. RIPR Political analyst Scott MacKay wonders why two veteran Democratic lawmakers won’t accept their primary defeats.

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House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello says the all-night session that closed out the legislative session will not happen again on his watch. Lawmakers concluded their 2016 session after sunrise on Saturday.

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Once again, Rhode Island lawmakers are ensnared in a joust over extending ethics oversight of the General Assembly. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says the measure isn’t likely to usher in change on Smith Hill.

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