RI Slave trade

Scott MacKay Commentary
2:57 pm
Wed November 26, 2014

Scott MacKay Commentary: Time To Focus On R.I. History In Our Public Schools

In this age of STEM and standardized tests, are we teaching enough Rhode Island history in our public schools?
Credit First Student Company

It sometimes seems as if all of our contemporary debates over education revolve around high-stakes testing. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says our schools are neglecting an important topic that isn’t tested.

Trying to figure out what’s happening in education nowadays is an exercise in futility. You have to learn a new language suffused with psycho babble and techno-speak:  educators use terms  like rubrics, social-emotional learning and  site-based management..

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Education
8:46 am
Thu October 9, 2014

One Square Mile: The Slave Trade On The Narragansett Bay

Portrait of John Potter (1716-1787) and his family including three women and a young black servant. John Potter was a wealthy South Kingstown planter.
Credit Newport Historical Society

We continue our series One Square Mile: Narragansett Bay with a look at the bay’s role in the slave trade. Tens of thousands of slaves were traded on ships out of Narragansett Bay, more than any other part of North America.

Newport was at one time the largest slave-trading port in the region. To find out more, Rhode Island Public Radio's education reporter Elisabeth Harrison met Newport history teacher Matt Boyle at Bannisters Wharf, which was built by a merchant involved in the slave trade. She asked him what it would have looked like in mid-18th Century.

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Scott MacKay Commentary
5:01 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Scott MacKay Commentary: Is Fox Yet Another RI Rascal Pol?

Former House Speaker Gordon Fox during the 2014 budget.
Credit Ian Donnis / RIPR

Once again, Rhode Island is attracting national attention for all the wrong reasons. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay has some thoughts about the federal raid on Speaker Gordon Fox’s office.

The specter of corruption in high political office haunts Rhode Island. As it has seemingly forever. For a state still in the grip of the recession, there are few things worse than the scene at the Statehouse Friday.

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