RIPR Top 5 2013

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

It’s back to school season in Rhode Island. There’s an ever so subtle hint of fall in the air and schools around the state are opening their doors again for students after the long summer break.

With the first day of school comes that familiar mix of nerves and excitement. Will my friends be the same?  What new people will I meet? Will I like my teachers? And perhaps no start of school is quite as nerve-wracking as the first day of junior high.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

There’s no shortage of advice on healthy eating. But sometimes it seems there’s a shortage of reliable advice. Medical schools traditionally don’t offer much training in nutrition, but a new partnership between Johnson & Wales University and Tulane medical school could change that.

Welcome to a busy kitchen classroom at Johnson & Wales University in Providence. Typically, you’d find only culinary students here, busy chopping or sautéing, trying to plate the perfect dish. But for the past few weeks, they’ve been working with some less-than-seasoned sous chefs.

Flo Jonic / RIPR

There's a commonly held misconception in Rhode Island that the jewelry industry is washed up, kaput, a victim of the ravaged manufacturing sector. But according to the Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation, we have the highest concentration of jobs in the jewelry industry in the United States. This morning as we continue our 'Made in Rhode Island' series, Rhode Island Public Radio's Flo Jonic delves into the jewelry industry through the eyes of three of its players:

Erik Gould

In less than 20 years, a quarter of the state’s population will be older than 60.  In a series we call “The Silver Boom: Aging in Rhode Island” we’re looking at how the state will take care of this expanding older population and how Rhode Island benefits from its older residents.  For example, they are the memory keepers, the informal historians of the state’s rich past. 

Gorham Manufacturing

Catherine Welch

New England accents are rich and varied, after all someone from Maine will say “park your car” very differently than someone from Boston or Rhode Island. In this month’s Artscape, we explore the way we talk. To do that, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Catherine Welch sat down with Brown University and Trinity Rep.’s master of dialects Thom Jones to dig into the stories behind the accents.