RISD

Courtesy RISD

After an international search, the Rhode Island School of Design has settled on one of its own to take over as president. RISD has tapped Rosanne Somerson, a RISD graduate who’s been serving as interim president since December 2013.

Former president John Maeda stepped down suddenly, after a rocky relationship with RISD faculty. Maeda surprised many at RISD when he announced he had taken a job at Silicon Valley venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins Caufield Byers.

The Rhode Island School of Design has selected Interim President Rosanne Somerson to takeover the position permanently. The RISD Board announced the decision to faculty and students on Wednesday morning.

“President Somerson is a gifted, inspiring leader with great integrity, humility and vision, and is the perfect fit for RISD,” said Board of Trustees Chair Michael Spalter in the official announcement.

The Rhode Island School of Design has started conducting "preliminary interviews" in the search for a new president, a little more than a year after the departure of Johhn Maeda in December of 2013.

In a post on the university web site, RISD says the search committee has received nominations from nearly 100 faculty and other interested parties. University Board Chair Michael Spalter confirmed that the interview process has begun.

John Bender / RIPR

As many take a day off for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, some are spending the day doing service projects.  A group of students in Providence celebrates with art.

In the gym at Martin Luther King elementary school, dozens of elementary school students are screen printing t-shirts, painting murals, and jewelry painting.  It’s part of the nationwide “day of service” program.  More than 100 Rhode Island School of Design students are working with the kids on their projects. 

RIPR FILE

Street crime is once again a political topic in Providence. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says it’s time for nightclub owners to better control their rowdy customers.

Federal Hill is more restaurant theme park than Little Italy these days. While the Providence neighborhood is dear to older generations of Italian-Americans, it is no longer the fulcrum of such revered up-from-poverty Rhode Islanders as former Sen. John Pastore, who grew up there.

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