roger williams university

Courtesy Roger Williams University

The role of race in college admissions has returned to the spotlight, after the U.S. Justice Department said it will take another look at Harvard University’s admissions policy. Any challenge to affirmative action could have little effect on some local colleges and universities.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

A path breaking Harvard University Law School professor and former clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall will keynote the 2017 Commencement exercises at Roger Williams Law School on May 19th at 1 p.m. at the RWU Athletic Field on the Bristol campus at One Old Ferry Road.

Ayoopdog / CC License via Wikimedia Commons

A group of Roger Williams University students who are studying abroad at the University of Westminster this semester have reported they are safe after the attack that left four people dead near Parliament in London.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

The heads of three Rhode Island universities join a growing list of leaders at higher learning institutions opposing President Trump’s executive order banning refugees and immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

Roger Williams University, Rhode Island College and Providence College hold commencement exercises this weekend, the start of several weekends honoring the class of 2016.

Providence College graduates will hear from Marathon Bombing survivor Heather Abbott at a ceremony at the Dunkin Donuts Center on Sunday. At Roger Williams, commencement exercises begin Saturday morning at the seaside campus in Bristol.

U.S. Labor Department

U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas Perez will be the commencement speaker at Roger Williams University Law School commencement exercises on May 13th at the school’s Bristol campus.

Perez, the son of immigrants from the Dominican Republic, is no stranger to Rhode Island. He is a 1983 Brown University graduate, who later earned a graduate degree in political science from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and a law degree from Harvard’s Law School.

Courtesy of Roger Williams University

In an effort to slow the effects of climate change, Roger Williams University is spearheading a tree-planting campaign. Trees can absorb and store rising concentrations of carbon dioxide, which are responsible for global warming.

The Bottom Line: Latino Workers Face Education, Economic Challenges

Mar 18, 2016

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave sit down with Anna Cano Morales, the head of the Latino Policy Institute at Roger Williams University.  Their discussion includes a recent survey of the fast-growing Latino work force, and the implications for Rhode Island's economy.

 When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50 p.m.

RIPR FILE

As racial tensions continue to make headlines on college campuses across the country, Roger Williams University will host a symposium on current and past black activist movements Thursday.

The day-long conference will feature scholars, poets, and a prominent member of the current Black Lives Matter movement. Organizers said the purpose of the event is to open a conversation about black activism and its history.

Roger Williams senior Marquis Caesar, one of the conference organizers, said there aren’t enough opportunities to have campus-wide discussions about race.

Steven Somerstein

A rare collection of photos of the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama are now on display at the Providence Public Library.

On Wednesday the photographer, Steven Somerstein, will deliver a talk about his experience taking the photos, witnessing the march, and interacting with influential black leaders of the time including, Martin Luther King Jr, James Baldwin, and Rosa Parks.

John Bender / RIPR

In an effort to keep more college graduates in Rhode Island, Roger Williams University is making some changes. The university is preparing to open a $10 million campus in downtown Providence, at the former site of 38 Studios and a marine center in Bristol.

Retired Rhode Island Superior Court  Judge Edward C. Clifton has joined the faculty of Roger Williams University Law School, where he will work with students to conduct research on ethnic and racial fairness in the court system.

Clifton, who retired after more than 20 years on the Superior Court  bench, has wide legal experience in Rhode Island. Before his appointment to Superior Court, Clifton served as Providence city solicitor, and as a judge on both the Providence Municipal Court and on the Rhode Island District Court.

Aaron Read / RIPR

A coalition of researchers from Rhode Island’s colleges and universities have released another round of reports on the state’s economy. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what will happen to the latest round of research.

If Rhode Island were a bench, it would splinter under the weight of all the blue-ribbon commissions and consultant-generated reports that have for decades weighed in on what ails our state’s economy.

Data released Monday by the Latino Policy Institute at Roger Williams University show that families with mixed immigration status face significant challenges. The numbers are based on a survey of nearly 180 Latino families. When at least one parent is an undocumented immigrant, researcher Kalina Brabeck says children may struggle in school.

Elisabeth Harrison

Warwick resident Nicholas Rovinski sits in a jail cell accused of conspiring to support the Islamic State in Iraq. Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon spoke with Roger Williams Law School Professor Peter Margulies about the charges against Rovinski and federal anti-terrorism law.

Margulies explains the FBI's case against Rovinski and says U.S. law allows a relatively wide definition of the term "conspiracy." Margulies observes that additional charges are possible in this case.

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