roger williams university

Data released Monday by the Latino Policy Institute at Roger Williams University show that families with mixed immigration status face significant challenges. The numbers are based on a survey of nearly 180 Latino families. When at least one parent is an undocumented immigrant, researcher Kalina Brabeck says children may struggle in school.

Elisabeth Harrison

Warwick resident Nicholas Rovinski sits in a jail cell accused of conspiring to support the Islamic State in Iraq. Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon spoke with Roger Williams Law School Professor Peter Margulies about the charges against Rovinski and federal anti-terrorism law.

Margulies explains the FBI's case against Rovinski and says U.S. law allows a relatively wide definition of the term "conspiracy." Margulies observes that additional charges are possible in this case.

Roger Williams University

Roger Williams University has launched the state’s first bachelor’s degree program in emergency medical services. The new major aims to prepare students to become paramedics and administrators – but not necessarily doctors.

About two dozen colleges and universities nationwide now offer undergraduate and graduate degrees in emergency medical services. That’s according to the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. The programs range in focus from preparing students to be EMTs to grooming future health care administrators.

Elisabeth Harrison

 A group of undergraduates at Roger Williams University have taken up the cause of an imprisoned Chinese dissident. And in the process they formed a special bond with his college-aged daughter. Rhode Island Public Radio education reporter Elisabeth Harrison reports the group was recently reunited at the Roger Williams campus in Bristol.

A small group of students sits on low couches in the library at Roger Williams University, just before lunchtime. One of them is a petite 20-year-old from China, with long, black hair and round cheeks. Her name is Jewher Ilham.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The average global temperature has gone up over the last century due to the phenomenon known as global warming. But one region in the north Atlantic has seen the opposite trend. A Roger Williams University researcher explains this anomaly in a recent paper published in Nature Climate Change.

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