Save the Bay

Wenley Ferguson / Save the Bay

Rhode Island’s ocean-facing beaches escaped most of the damage from last weekend’s storm, but some sand dunes eroded during high tides made higher by the Nor'easter.


Avory Brookins / RIPR

An estimated 300 people attended a public meeting in Providence Wednesday on the Trump administration’s plan to drill for oil and gas off the East Coast.

Avory Brookins / RIPR

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo’s budget proposal for fiscal year 2019 includes a large environmental bond worth $48.5 million to fund land and water quality improvements. It's one of four ballot initiatives the governor is proposing for November 2018.  

Avory Brookins / RIPR

Lawmakers and environmentalists are disappointed in and concerned about the federal Environmental Protection Agency's decision to stop three agency scientists from talking about their research on climate change. 

RIPR

Save the Bay, an organization dedicated to protecting Narragansett Bay, is offering tips on how Rhode Islanders can reduce their contribution to polluted rainwater that runs off of lawns and hard surfaces into the bay.


Gage Skidmore / Flickr

U.S. Sen. Jack Reed is set to host an environmental roundtable at the Save the Bay Center in Providence Monday. The forum ahead of an expected Senate vote for Scott Pruitt, President Donald Trump’s pick to head the Environmental Protection Agency.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

  Three of the state’s largest environmental groups have announced their opposition to the proposed power plant in Burrillville, citing concerns over threats to the climate, forest habitats and biodiversity.

John Bender / RIPR

The Port of Providence operator has updated its expansion plans to address concerns flagged by environmental advocates at Save the Bay. 

John Bender / RIPR

The environmental organization Save The Bay on Monday sharply criticized the proposal for a $20 million taxpayer-financed port development project on the Providence waterfront.

Policy and Pinot Panel 05-18-2016
Aaron Read RIPR

This month’s Policy & Pinot will focus on the state of the region’s energy grid, which has undergone dramatic changes. Older oil- and coal-fired power plants are retiring, while natural gas production is increasing. State laws requiring ambitious reductions in greenhouse gas emissions have been driving the shift toward cleaner energy from the sun, wind and water.

Located at Save the Bay's offices overlooking Narragansett Bay, and moderated by RIPR environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza, we’ll talk with our guest panelists about what the future grid could look like, how greener energy may impact consumers, and how Rhode Island’s progress compares to other states.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

This year’s highest tides are predicted Friday and Saturday night during this month’s new moon. They’ll provide a glimpse of what daily high tides may look like in a future with higher sea levels.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Environmental advocacy groups and businesses have been finding common ground in recent years around an unlikely issue: stronger enforcement of environmental laws.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Earlier this spring, we brought you a report from our series Battle With The Sea about the impact of climate change on Aquidneck Island's drinking water with warmer temperatures, heavier rains, and more intense storms. But there’s more to the story. We pick up where we left off.

By law, the Coastal Resources Management Council should have two hearing officers to oversee contested cases. But the agency has gone without a full-time hearing officer for more than 10 years.

  The state’s largest environmental advocacy group, Save The Bay, has called on Gov. Gina Raimondo to appoint at least one full-time hearing officer to the CRMC.

John Bender / RIPR

Over the years, the state has slashed budgets across all government agencies, including the Department of Environmental Management. This agency, tasked with protecting the environment, has seen a decline in staffing. Environmental advocates say these cuts have weakened and slowed enforcing environmental laws and regulations.   

Earlier this year, residents packed a small room at the Statehouse for a hearing about a zoning bill. They complained to lawmakers about industrial pollution from a quarry in Westerly. Residents blame the DEM for poor monitoring and enforcement.

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