Save the Bay

Battle With The Sea
6:28 am
Thu May 7, 2015

Battle With The Sea: Protecting Newport's Drinking Water (Part 1)

A map by the University of Rhode Island Coastal Resources Center, the Rhode Island Sea Grant, and the URI Environmental Data Center shows Easton Pond is vulnerable to sea level rise and storm surge.
URI/RI Sea Grant

With more than 500 public drinking water suppliers in the state, the Rhode Island Department of Health is worried about how they will cope with climate-related changes like intense rains, rising seas, and warmer temperatures. For the next installment of our series, Battle With The Sea, environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza heads to Newport, home to one of the most vulnerable drinking water supplies in the state when it comes to climate change.

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Battle With The Sea
7:00 am
Wed March 11, 2015

Battle With The Sea: Helping Salt Marshes Adapt To Rapidly Rising Seas

A small industrial machine designed to scoop out mud travels back and forth on a stable section of Round Marsh in Jamestown.
Ambar Espinoza RIPR

Rhode Island is losing salt marshes at an alarming rate. Scientists and coastal planners say this is one of the most pressing climate change impacts already facing the Ocean State. Salt marshes are critical fish and wildlife habitats that support the state's fishing and tourism industries.

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Environment
9:39 am
Mon February 9, 2015

Braving The Cold Weather For Season's Best Seal Watching In Rhode Island

Seals in the Narragansett Bay. Their population have shot back after years in decline.
Credit Courtesy Save The Bay

Seals from Maine and the Atlantic Provinces of Canada start migrating to Narragansett Bay in October. But February is one of the best months for seal watching in Narragansett Bay. That’s when the number of migrating seals peaks, ranging between 300-500. 

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Health Care
6:00 am
Wed October 8, 2014

One Square Mile: Open Water Swimming Grows, For Exercise And Community

Open water swimmer Susan Hannel loves the group that gathers week nights at Narragansett Town Beach.
Kristin Gourlay RIPR

This week we’re bringing you stories from our series One Square Mile: Narragansett Bay. We’re taking a deep dive into the bay that helps define the Ocean State. Its history. Its present. Its future. Now, a look at how the bay keeps us healthy, through the eyes of a few of the growing numbers of open water swimmers.

Gathering for an evening swim

We’re sitting on a ledge at Narragansett town beach. The sky is overcast, it’s early evening. Dozens of people are suiting up for a swim.

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Environment
8:52 am
Tue February 11, 2014

Local Environmental Leaders Call For Better Water Management

Environmental agency directors and city managers focused on the urgent need to invest in wastewater infrastructure, stormwater management, and flood prevention at a meeting last night.

The nonprofit Save The Bay hosted its annual legislative briefing.  Executive director Jonathan Stone said many groups are working together to ensure the general assembly approves Gov. Lincoln Chafee's 75-million-dollar clean water bond.

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