scott mackay

The old Rhode Island cliché is that only the best families in our state can trace their lineage all the way back to a slave trader or rum-runner. One of those families, the DeWolfs of Bristol, have dug deep into their family’s dark past as the largest slave-trading family in U.S. history.

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So Twin River’s parent company wants to build a new casino in Tiverton.   The idea is likely to raise a few eyebrows, but RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says it  has to be done.

There are many Rhode Islanders who don’t believe that state government should be in the business of promoting gambling. Those critics point out the lottery games and slot-machine emporiums that speckle New England like daffodils these days are little more than cheap taxes on the poor.

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  The Women’s Fund of Rhode Island is honoring RI Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed, D-Newport, with the organization’s Susan L. Farmer Award.

The award will honor Paiva Weed for her leadership role as the first female Senate president and for her support for the state’s Temporary Caregivers Insurance program, which was a top priority of the Women’s Fund of RI.

Paiva Weed became the first women to hold the post of Senate president in 2009. She is a lawyer and Providence College graduate.

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  The 195 Redevelopment Commission has decided to open to the public Monday’s meeting with the new owners of the Pawtucket Red Sox, who want to move the team from McCoy Stadium to a new ballpark that would be built on about 9 acres of former 195 land on the Providence riverfront.

Principal owners Larry Lucchino and James Skeffington are scheduled to discuss the stadium plans with commission members. The meeting was originally scheduled as an executive session that was to have been closed to the public.

The debate over Rhode Island taxpayer support for a new stadium for the PawSox in Providence has started. RIPR Political Analyst Scott MacKay talks about state government’s next move.

Listening to the opening salvos in the Providence stadium debate reminds one of William Faulkner’s dictum about the American South: "The past is never dead. It isn’t even past.’’

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