solar

Kathleen Masterson / Vermont Public Radio

After years of encouraging solar development, Vermont seems to be attracting the attention of national solar companies.


RIPR

State lawmakers are hoping new legislation will grow the green energy industry. 


RIPR

A program designed to finance projects to make commercial buildings more energy efficient is growing in Rhode Island. 

Thirteen more municipalities are working to participate in the Rhode Island Commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy program. Fourteen other municipalities have already joined since the program launched in May 2016.

Multiple TV's in Studio A at RIPR
Aaron Read RIPR

Thanks to a recent major grant that RIPR applied for and received, we have added several 40-inch LCD TV screens to Studio A, our "air studio".   Four total, plus a fifth existing LCD TV.  So we can watch ALL the things!!!

RIPR Satellite Dish Heater
Aaron Read

  Oh the weather outside is frightful…

Actually, this winter we haven’t seen too much snow.  Nevertheless, snow is something of a chore for us at RIPR, because it builds up on our SATELLITE DISH, which blocks the satellite signal.  Specifically, our NPR and BBC signal, and that means when it snows = dead air on RIPR!

TheEC: Solar Outages

Oct 11, 2012

It has to do with our satellite downlink from NPR. We have a hefty 13-foot-diameter satellite dish, located in North Providence; there's no room for it at One Union Station! It points to "Galaxy 16," a telecommunications satellite in "geostationary" orbit that all NPR stations use.

"Geostationary," also popularly referred to as "geosynchronous," means that the satellite orbits the Earth in sync with the Earth's rotation...about 6800 MPH. That's pretty fast, but the key is that it's the SAME speed for both. So from our perspective here on Earth, the satellite just floats there, not moving, over 22,000 miles up in the sky!  To put that in perspective, it's like driving from northeastern Maine to southwestern California, SEVEN TIMES.

In Galaxy 16's case, the satellite is at 99.0 degrees west longitude, meaning it's fixed above a point on the equator over the Pacific Ocean, about 500 miles west of the Galapagos Islands (near Ecuador).

In general, geostationary orbits work great for communications satellites like for NPR, but there's a catch: twice a year there's times when the Sun, the satellite, and our dish all line up perfectly.  It's only for four or five days, and only for four or five minutes per day...but the Sun puts out so much energy on ALL frequencies that it completely swamps the satellite's own signal, so we lose all NPR, BBC and other satellite programming.