stadium

Thirteen consecutive losing seasons. Just three winning seasons since 1985. Zero championships since the 1984 and 1985 teams won back-to-back Yankee Conference titles. Zero playoff appearances since the 1985 team lost in the quarterfinals of the NCAA I-AA Tournament.

Its 6,500-seat “stadium” tied with New Hampshire for the smallest in the Colonial Athletic Association. Except for brief streaks in the 1950s and early 1980s, no tradition of winning football going back more than a century to the inaugural campaign in 1895.

All that at an annual cost of about $3.6 million.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

The potential cost of buying Brown University-owned land for a PawSox stadium is raising questions about the feasibility of the project, a team spokeswoman said Thursday.

PawSox spokeswoman Patti Doyle said the team still hopes to reach a renegotiated agreement to build a 10,000-seat ballpark on part of the former I-195 land in Providence.

But Doyle acknowledged that the cost of buying the part of the land owned by Brown -- expected to top $10 million -- is leading to questions of "Is this still workable? Is this something we can come to terms with?"

  Thank goodness for a new week. Could last week have been any worse for Boston sports?

When the PawSox owner, Ben Mondor, died in 2010, the future of the team was cast into doubt. A new ownership group took over the team earlier this year. Then, two months later, they unveiled their request for taxpayers’ help to build a new stadium on part of the former I-195 land in Providence. The team asked for 120 million dollars in state lease payments and a 30-year exemption from Providence property taxes. The proposal sparked a mostly negative reaction from the public.