Steven Costantino

Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. There's lots going on, so we'll get right to it.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The key sponsor of the bill later used to attract 38 Studios to Rhode Island returned to the Statehouse from his current out-of-state job Thursday evening, distancing himself from responsibility in an hours-long meeting that was rich in theatrics yet thin on fresh details.

Former House Finance Committee chairman Steven Costantino said he set the $125 million size of the job creation guarantee program passed in 2010, and then applied to 38 Studios, with the idea of helping a number of businesses.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Former House Finance chairman Steve Costantino said through his lawyer Wednesday that he's willing to return to Rhode Island to answer questions about the state's ill-fated investment in the video game company 38 Studios.

"Mr. Costantino is aware of the intent of the committee you chair to have him appear for testimony on January 14, 2016," lawyer Marc DeSisto writes in a letter to Oversight Chairwoman Karen MacBeth. "I have been authorized by Mr. Costantino to advise you that he is willing to appear and testify before your committee without the need to utilize a subpoena."

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The recent 38 Studios lawsuit disclosures have provided an inside view of how Rhode Island state government let you down. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay points to other state agencies in dire need of oversight.

Steven Costantino, Rhode Island's former secretary of Health and Human Services, was appointed by Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin on Monday as commissioner of the Department of Vermont Health Access. The department is responsible for Vermont's publicly funded insurance programs.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor-elect Gina Raimondo on Sunday said she's nominating Elizabeth Roberts to lead the state Executive Office of Health and Human Services with the expectation that Roberts will make EOHHS a national leader in controlling growing Medicaid costs.

Rhode Islanders who are covered by both Medicare and Medicaid - the so-called "dual eligibles" - take note: you're being enrolled in a new health plan designed to coordinate your primary care and long term care needs a bit better. It's called the Integrated Care Initiative, it could affect nearly 28,000 Rhode Islanders, and it's not without controversy.

But first, what's it about?