storm

Rain expected to wash away much of snow

Feb 9, 2013
Aaron Read / RIPR

The National Weather Service is still compiling the data from this past weekend’s snow storm.  But even without official measurements Meteorologist Matthew Belk says: we saw a lot of snow. “Looking across Rhode Island we’re looking at widespread accumulations of a foot and a-half to two and a-half feet of snow.  The highest snowfall that I see in RI is 27.6 inches in West Glocester.

News from the Gallup Wellbeing poll: healthy behaviors declined after Superstorm Sandy in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut, the hardest hit states.

The survey found residents less likely to be getting 30 minutes of regular exercise, and less likely to be eating healthy food. Why?

Providence officials are preparing for what the National Weather Service says could be a historic snow storm.

The weather can change in an instant, of course. But officials are bracing for a whopper of a snowstorm starting tomorrow and lasting through Saturday afternoon. We could see winds up to 60 miles an hour by late Friday, coastal flooding, even thunder and lightning according to some reports.

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Feb 7, 2013
Snowfall in Hope, RI
Susan Greenhalgh

Winter Storm Nemo is heading our way.  Making sure veterans have what they need as they return to civilian life.  These stories and more on the RIPR Morning News Podcast. 


Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you.  news@ripr.org
 

Lydia Rogers / RIPR

Hundreds of homes and businesses are still without power in Rhode Island. That’s down from about 25,000 early this morning.

National Grid spokesman David Graves says last night was a wild one in Rhode Island. 60-mile-an-hour winds ripped through trees and snagged power lines. He says crews are still working on restoring power to thousands of customers, mainly in southeastern Massachusetts and parts of Rhode Island.

PROVIDENCE, RI  - A powerful winter storm headed for New England has power company workers on standby to respond to outages. That's because high winds expected with this storm could down trees and power lines. National Grid spokeswoman Debbie Drew says the company is on alert for any problems.

"We've activated our emergency response system. And we're watching the storm track very closely," said Drew. "That helps us determine where best to deploy crews so we can get them to hard hit areas quickly."

Pages