technology

Newport's Cliff Walk Gets High Tech Upgrades

Apr 29, 2015
RIPR FILE

Newport’s famous Cliff Walk is now smart-phone friendly. The tourist attraction has added 16 trail markers with quick response codes. Visitors can get historic and geological information with a quick smartphone scan.

Salve Regina University Professor Jon Marcoux worked with students to create the app.

“This is a great example of something that was doable for an undergraduate, and they did it, but hopefully it will have a big payoff for folks who are visiting.”

Marcoux said using technology increases the breadth of information available to tourists.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Women make up nearly 60 percent of the U-S workforce, but Federal Labor Department Statistics show they account for less than a quarter of all software designers. So how do you change that? One national program thinks it has the answer. It’s called Girls Who Code. Rhode Island Public Radio’s education reporter Elisabeth Harrison visited a chapter at Lincoln School in Providence.

Jay Dickson / Brown University/University of Texas/National Science Foundation

Monitoring how the climate is changing in Antarctica’s most stable environments, the desert valleys, is very difficult. But that’s what Jay Dickson, a staff scientist at Brown University’s Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences, is trying to do, using time-lapse photography.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Providence tech startup Swipely, which has grown significantly since it was launched in 2009, says a new infusion of $20 million in venture capital funding will enable it to continue expanding a small spark of Silicon Valley in Rhode Island.

"The intent is to use those funds to continue to aggressively growing the team in all our areas, including our engineering team, our marketing and sales team, and other departments within the company," Swipely founder Angus Davis said during a news conference Thursday morning.

In a sign of the growing battle between app-based transportation services, Lyft -- which lets consumers decide how much they want to pay for a ride -- is launching in the Providence market on Friday.

While Lyft bears a few strong similarities to Uber, which came to Providence last September, Lyft spokeswoman Paige Thelen says the company emphasizes an "in-person experience" and is about "building a community."

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