Elisabeth Harrison

Governor Gina Raimondo is defending her administration from criticism that information has become harder to obtain.

Some reporters, editors and good government groups have complained about less-than-forthcoming responses to requests for public documents and a lack of access to public officials under Raimondo's leadership.  

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Open government advocates expressed frustration Tuesday about what they called diminished access to information and records under the administration of Governor Gina Raimondo. The governor's chief of staff, Stephen Neuman, responded by vowing the state will do better and by issuing a memo calling on state agencies to prioritize disclosure in difficult cases "whenever possible."

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Members of Governor Gina Raimondo’s staff are set to meet with representatives of five open government groups Tuesday afternoon at the State House to discuss recent criticism about a lack of government transparency.

Raimondo’s chief of staff, Stephen Neuman, is slated to lead the 4:30 pm meeting, according to spokeswoman Marie Aberger. The governor's legal counsel, Claire Richards, and communications director, Joy Fox, and/or Aberger are also expected to attend the meeting in Neuman's office.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Treasurer Seth Magaziner on Tuesday unveiled an initiative to bring more transparency to his office.

Magaziner says his initiative will make the treasurer’s office a national leader in transparency. For example, he said one new policy requires investment fund managers that want state business to disclose information about their finances.

Your humble correspondent took a few days off before the Memorial Day weekend. So we're diverting from our usual TGIF this week, turning the space over for a guest column by John Marion, executive director of Common Cause of Rhode Island, on the highly relevant theme of government transparency and open meetings. Take it away, John ....

Democratic gubernatorial candidates Gina Raimondo and Angel Taveras continue to scrap over the unwillingness of Point Judith Capital, the venture capital firm Raimondo founded, to disclose details of a limited partnership agreement it made with the City of Providence.