transportation

RIPR FILE

State officials will celebrate the completion of a multi-million dollar runway expansion at T.F. Green Airport on Monday. Previous expansions raised the ire of some residents and city officials, who cited concerns about noise and environmental pollution. But these days, plenty of Warwick residents don’t seem to mind.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Providence drivers could soon see more cameras at traffic lights. The city council gave first passage to an ordinance Monday to install 20 new so-called “red light” cameras. The cameras snap photos of cars running red lights, so a ticket can be mailed to the driver.  

Feds Back Away From Controversial Rail Plan Along New England Coast

Jul 13, 2017
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Federal Railroad Administration announced Wednesday that it won’t go ahead with a controversial plan to re-route a major rail artery in Connecticut and Rhode Island.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

  The Federal Railroad Administration is working on plans to bring more high-speed rail to the Northeast Corridor. It’s the busiest stretch of passenger rail in the nation that spans from Washington, D.C. to Boston.

RIPR FILE

The Federal Railroad Administration has proposed a major expansion of the Northeast rail corridor from Washington, D.C. through Providence and Boston. The plan would cost an estimated $120 billion, to build new tracks, new lines, and more trains.

The FRA says most of the railways on the line should be expanded from two to four tracks, and it calls for direct and frequent service to Hartford, Connecticut and Springfield, Massachusetts.

RI DOT

Providence and state officials unveiled Thursday what is likely the final proposal for the 6-10 connector reconstruction project. The aging highway system needs immediate replacement, according to the Governor's office. Several plans to fix it have pitted urban planning advocates against state officials and cost concerns.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave speak with Scott Wolf, executive director of the nonprofit Grow Smart Rhode Island, about the future of the 6/10 Connector.

Governor Gina Raimondo has accelerated plans to repair the highway due to safety concerns. But Wolf says there is still time to consider alternatives, including a modified boulevard concept favored by some community groups and transit advocates.

When to listen:

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Critics are voicing disappointment following Gov. Gina Raimondo’s announcement that repairs to the 6/10 connector will be placed on a fast-track, leaving little hope that the corridor will get a major redesign.

Transportation advocates had hoped to see roadway transformed into a boulevard.

Advocates for the idea say a boulevard would offer better access to existing streets in Providence, and make room for pedestrians and cyclists. But the state announced this week the 6/10 connector is in such poor condition, there won’t be time for a major redesign.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The state Department of Transportation held the last in a series of workshops Wednesday on the future of the 6/10 Connector. State DOT director Peter Alviti recently stopped by our studio to talk about the future of the Connector and related issues. Alviti spoke with Rhode Island Public Radio political reporter Ian Donnis and political analyst Scott MacKay.

(We should note that this conversation took place before a sometimes terse meeting on the 6/10 Connector earlier this week.)

RIPR FILE

Rhode Island Transit officials announced the creation of a new bus corridor through downtown Providence. The 1.4 mile transit project replaces the now-scrapped city streetcar project. 

Moving Forward PVD

Transportation activist James Kennedy is one of the leaders of the movement calling for remaking the 6/10 Connector as a boulevard. He stopped by our studio to talk about the concept and why he considers it a smart idea.

John Bender

After months of street construction, new traffic patterns have been introduced in downtown Providence. Two major roads that used to be one direction only are now open for two-way traffic. The streets are Dorrance Street in front of the Biltmore Hotel and Exchange Terrace leading toward the Convention Center.

RIPR FILE

The Rhode Island Public Transit Authority holds its last series of public meetings Monday and Tuesday to discuss potential changes in fares.

RIPTA will host the listening sessions in Newport, Providence, Pawtucket and Warwick on Monday and Tuesday. RIPTA officials say this is the first comprehensive study of all the authority’s fare offerings.

RIPTA Spokesperson Barbara Polichetti said this is also an opportunity to look at possible changes in how customers obtain tickets.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Standing under a decaying highway overpass in Olneyville, Governor Gina Raimondo on Wednesday unveiled a plan to improve Rhode Island's crumbling bridges by imposing a yet-to-be determined charge on large commercial trucks.

The plan calls for a $700 million bond issue, to be included as part of the budget for the next fiscal year, to jump-start transit-related construction work. To the delight of unionized workers in attendance, Raimondo characterized the initiative -- dubbed "Rhode Works" -- as a measure that will improve infrastructure while creating construction jobs.

John Bender

Police have identified the nine-year-old girl fatally struck on Thursday by a public bus in Providence.

According to police, she was third-grader Ani Emdjian. She was walking to school with her father when she was hit, a little before 9 o'clock in the morning. She died at a hospital some time later.

The accident on Smith Street, just blocks from the statehouse, involved a Rhode Island Public Transit Authority bus. Police have now identified the driver as 42-year-old Eric Seaberg of Smithfield. 

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