Numbers out of the Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training show there are more people working than originally thought.

The DLT compared quarterly tax data from employers with numbers out of the Bureau of Labor Statistics that are estimates based on survey sampling. The tax data show Rhode Island gained 6,500 jobs between September of 2012 and September of 2013. That’s double the number based on federal estimates. 

Flo Jonic

Senator Jack Reed says he’s pleased a bill he co-sponsored to extend unemployment benefits for 90 days has moved forward in the Senate on a procedural vote. And he’d like to see it continue to move forward without having to negotiate how to pay for it. But Reed says he’s open on that point.

Flo Jonic / RIPR

U.S. Senator Jack Reed, who has taken a leadership role in the democratic drive to renew long-term unemployment insurance benefits, has made a national call for Republicans to join the effort.

Reed was one of four Senate democrats who held a nationwide media conference call Sunday in an effort to break a congressional logjam over long-term unemployment insurance. The insurance expired last week when lawmakers failed to extend a recession-era law providing nearly a year of benefits after state jobless benefits run out.


Making ends meet is about to get harder for thousands of Rhode Island families who will lose their unemployment benefits Saturday.  Those taking the hit are the long-term unemployed.

Congressional failure to renew the Emergency Unemployment Compensation program will result in the loss of benefits to 1.3 million Americans starting tomorrow. In Rhode Island, six thousand long-term unemployed individuals will lose their weekly checks. In the first six months of 2014 another nine thousand will join their ranks.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for a weekly business segment we're calling "The Bottom Line." Each Friday they look at business news and themes that affect local business and the public.

File photo / RIPR

Our panel this week discusses RI's persistently high unemployment; Senator Dawson Hodgson's renewed call for an outside investigation into 38 Studios; Angel Taveras' proposal for instituting universal pre-K in Rhode Island; and Scott MacKay and Maureen Moakley's top turkeys of 2013.

Rhode Islanders will have to wait a little longer this month to find out what the September unemployment rate was. The state Department of Labor and Training says the data will not be released as scheduled on October 17th because of the partial government shutdown.

Department spokeswoman Laura Hart said the Census Bureau collects data that is used to calculate the state jobless rate.

An East Providence man has pleaded no contest to unemployment insurance fraud.  Forty-nine-year-old Richard Daigle was sentenced to ten years probation and ordered to pay restitution to the state in excess of $10,000.

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin said if the case had gone to trial, prosecutors would have proven that for a six-month period starting in 2010 Daigle was working at a Stop N Shop store but failed to advise the state Department of Labor and Training of his earnings.

Rhode Island's Unemployment Increasing

Sep 20, 2013

Rhode Island’s unemployment rate is headed in the wrong direction.

Rhode Island’s unemployment rate increased from 8.9 percent in July to 9.1 percent in August.  At the same time the national unemployment rate fell one-tenth of a percentage point to 7.3 percent.

The number of unemployed residents is 50,100 – up 800 from July. Over the year, however, the number of unemployed has fallen by about eight thousand.

The U.S. Census Bureau’s latest data contain mixed signals about the state of Rhode Island’s economy.   The median income climbed by double digits but the state still has the highest poverty rate in the region.

While Rhode Island’s median household income climbed 14 percent from 2011 to 2012, the state remained stuck with the highest poverty rate in New England. Thirteen-point-six percent of all residents are living below the federal poverty level. Second is Maine at 12.8 percent.