University of Rhode Island

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Deepwater Wind has installed the first of five steel foundations for a wind farm that will sit three miles off the coast of Block Island. The project is expected to produce enough energy to power 17,000 homes. State and federal officials got an up-close look at construction for the first time yesterday. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza was with them, and she reports that Rhode Island has become an example for how to build renewable energy. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Scientists at the University of Rhode Island (URI) have helped solve the mystery blast at Salty Brine beach. The likely source of the explosion was the combustion of hydrogen gas, which was produced by a disconnected copper cable underneath the beach. That cable, owned by the U.S. Coast Guard, used to power a navigational light at the end of the jetty.

The explosion didn’t leave behind any chemical residues, which told scientists to home in on clean-burning gases, such as methane or hydrogen.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

State and federal officials are turning to researchers at the University of Rhode Island to help them understand what happened at Salty Brine State Beach over the weekend when a mini explosion knocked a woman into a jetty, leaving her with two broken ribs. A team of scientists will convene at the beach at low tide later today to collect samples in their search for answers.

RIPR FILE

Rhode Island is in the midst of the most dangerous tick-season of the year. University of Rhode Island researchers say there are more of the insects this year than last year. The arachnids are most prevalent in May, but URI tick specialist Tom Mather, says mid-summer carries the highest risk.

“What we face now is a dangerous period, which is when nymphal-stage deer ticks are active, and these are ticks that are the size of poppy seeds, and they are loaded with pathogens,” said Mather.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Woonsocket-based CVS Health says it’s paying nearly $2 billion dollars to take over Target’s pharmacies and walk-in clinics. The deal adds more than 1600 pharmacies and nearly 100 walk-in clinics to CVS’s growing portfolio nationwide.

                                                      

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